Snow Bunting

Plectrophenax nivalis

ML279033171


©
Marshall Iliff
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eBird Checklist S76037316
Millennium Park
Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States
Search this location, Illustrated Checklist
Latitude and Longitude 42.2816, -71.1855 Map

Age
Unknown
Sex
Unknown
Sounds
Flight Call
Behaviors
Flying
Breeding
Tags
;
Playback
Not Used

Media notes

these notes duplicated in bunting and wren species comments: I have personally always found the Snow Bunting flight call to be really similar to the Carolina Wren musical twitter-trill that is one of their primary calls. This actually helps me distinguish Snow Bunting flight rattle from the Lapland Longspur rattle, which can also be challenging at times. These almost always segregate easily by habitat/behavior: a bird calling overhead is a clear Snow Bunting and one from a dense thicket is a wren. But sometimes when heard out of context these send my brian to the wrong option briefly before I realize the origin of the sound. This has always embarrassed me a little, but I have come to embrace their similarity. So I felt even better when this Snow Bunting flew over, calling loudly, and while I was audio recording it prompted a Carolina Wren to call *in response*! The bunting literally "taped in" the wren! And on the spectrogram, the calls look as similar as they sound to me in the field. So all my shame is now gone and I fully embrace their super cool similarity in calls now.

Observation details

calling flyover; overdue FOY here; I have personally always found the Snow Bunting flight call to be really similar to the Carolina Wren musical twitter-trill that is one of their primary calls. This actually helps me distinguish Snow Bunting flight rattle from the Lapland Longspur rattle, which can also be challenging at times. These almost always segregate easily by habitat/behavior: a bird calling overhead is a clear Snow Bunting and one from a dense thicket is a wren. But sometimes when heard out of context these send my brian to the wrong option briefly before I realize the origin of the sound. This has always embarrassed me a little, but I have come to embrace their similarity. So I felt even better when this Snow Bunting flew over, calling loudly, and while I was audio recording it prompted a Carolina Wren to call *in response*! The bunting literally "taped in" the wren! And on the spectrogram, the calls look as similar as they sound to me in the field. So all my shame is now gone and I fully embrace their super cool similarity in calls now.

Background Species

American Pipit - Anthus rubescens
American Robin - Turdus migratorius
American Tree Sparrow - Spizelloides arborea
Blue Jay - Cyanocitta cristata
Carolina Wren - Thryothorus ludovicianus
Song Sparrow - Melospiza melodia
Tufted Titmouse - Baeolophus bicolor

Technical Information

Recorder
iPhone 8
Microphone
Accessories
Voice Record Pro
Original file size
8,022KB

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