ML 80354

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Cassin's Finch -- Haemorhous cassinii More
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Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

1 Adult  

Uncertain

Sight and Sound

 

Natural
 

call

song

establish flock contact

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Cassin's Finch -- Haemorhous cassinii
Dusky Flycatcher -- Empidonax oberholseri
Hairy Woodpecker -- Picoides villosus
Mountain Chickadee -- Poecile gambeli
House Wren -- Troglodytes aedon
American Robin -- Turdus migratorius
Warbling Vireo -- Vireo gilvus

Randolph S Little
6 Jun 1991 at 07:35

    Geography
  • United States
    California
    Locality
  • 16.0 km SE of Loyalton; Jones Valley
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 39.5833333   -120.1166667
    Elevation
  • 2100 meters
    Habitats
  • Forest
  • Freshwater
  • Grassland
  • Coniferous Forest
  • Evergreen Forest
  • Meadow
  • Pasture
    Features
  • Second-growth
  • Scrub
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA IV-D
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 404
    Accessories
  • Parabola 91.4cm/30.5cm (36in/12in)
    Equipment Note

NOTES: (Species Sound: constant; Breeding Status: not territorial, breeding?, not breeding?; Behavioral Context: mate contact?; General Climate: arid; Cover Density: medium)

Recordist's Note: "First part of this recording sounds like Mountain Bluebird, which was also nesting in this aspen grove. There was no mention of Mountain Bluebird on the original tape, and no break in the recording at the point where it launches into typical Cassin's Finch sound. Identification of the first part should be considered tentative."

[The vocalizations in the first two parts of this recording (0:05-0:46, 0:47-1:00) are probably those of Carpodacus cassinii, despite their similarity to the song of a bluebird. If if indeed a vocalization of the finch, this probably represents a vocalization that is homologous to the "vireo" song described in the BNA account for C. purpureus, but not for C. cassinii (see also LNS #96373, #120291). The single true song and the calls at the end of the recording are certainly those of Carpodacus cassinii, the calls probably representing the "keeup/tidilip" calls described in BNA. There may also be some "tew" calls (e.g., 1:45, 2:49). Based on the calls given, I suspect that this is the same individual highlighted in LNS #80352 and #80353. The single song (1:02-1:06) ends with what appear to be imitations of Cyanocitta stelleri. Quality added (2, 1-2) - CAM - 4 February 2005]

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