ML 71925

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Lined Seedeater -- Sporophila lineola More
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Gray Seedeater -- Sporophila intermedia
Blue-black Grassquit -- Volatinia jacarina

Paul A Schwartz
24 Sep 1974 at 00:00

    Geography
  • Venezuela
    Apure
    Locality
  • road to Sta. Elisa; Site 2
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 7.9   -67.45
    Elevation
  • 70 meters
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA UNSPECIFIED IV
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 405
    Accessories
  • Parabola 91.4cm (36in)
    Equipment Note

NOTES: Neotropical Institute Cut #94. Bulk reel #524
The description given is for the bird that responded to playback of a), and it did respond very actively. (See also general note of this date.)
a) 8:20 AM. Natural song. (Medium to heavy mottling, with "tiger striping" on sides, no visible white crown.) Quality: 2. Level: +2, 0. 3.75 ips. 203 tape. LN.
Sporophila intermedia and Volatinia jacarina are heard prominently.
b) This is believed to be same bird (and almost surely is) a long time (~ 30') after any playback. Quality: 1. Level: 0, +3. 7.5 ips. LN? Std? (By error this was recorded with Std. equal.)
c) 9:05 AM. Presumably and probably (to judge from its rattle), the same bird. Also it looked like the same bird. Quality: 1. Level: +3. 7.5 ips. LN. Collected.
In this part the bird begins to use "complex" (= long) phrases. The "complex" part ofo the phrase is rather different from normal, including other birds in this region; however, it may be this ~ "warbled" variation that I heard last year at Site 1 (cf. note of 4 Oct 1973 on back of editing sheet for Cuts 61/63.
Note that after b) was recorded the bird left, apparently to forage elsewhere. After a while I heard it, or a bird, sing from some 30 m. away. I think that was this bird, for it then sang briefly, or at least this bird did, from a couple perches closer and finally took a perch high in the tree where I was standing and sang there for a long time, resulting in c). Just after the last phrase of c) the bird again left, again presumably to forage somewhere. After some t ime I heard it singing in a tree some 15 m. away as I began some playback experiments, the notes about which are on the general notes for this date.
d) 9:40 AM. Weather: Cloudy, fair. Same bird after playback experiments. Quality: 1. Level: +3. 7.5 ips. LN.
After the playback experiments the bird sang mostly short phrases. After some time it did begin to inject partially developed long phrases (usually when I was not recording!). Bird was then collected = male #[blank].
Note that this bird's rattle phrase is rather like a Furnarid rattle (Asthenes wyatti, Certhiaxis cinnamomea).

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