ML 70934

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Red-legged Tinamou -- Crypturellus erythropus More
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Sound

 

 

song

 

 

Paul A Schwartz
11 Aug 1973 at 15:50

    Geography
  • Venezuela
    Guárico
    Locality
  • 33.0 km N of Calabozo; ~47 km S of Dos Caminos; km 142.5 Rte. 2
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 9.2   -67.42
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA SNN
    Microphones
  • AKG Unspecified
    Accessories
    Equipment Note

NOTES: Neotropical Institute Cut #33. Bulk reel #493
Song type 1 = SO-SOO-la; 2 = SO-SO-LA; 3 = SO-LAA.
Altitude: 150-200 m.
a) Several birds heard = type 1 & 2 & ~3. Quality: 2-3. Level: 0. 203 tape. LN. parts of SN tape rerecorded from N-4.2 to N-IV; filt. 500/2500 Hz.
A type 1 bird eventually decoyed closer and was then collected = male #[blank].
b) A type ~2 (sometimes 3?? or a different bird?).
On way back to RG after several days at Hato Masaguaral (where the Soisolas were not singing, nor could they be indluced by playback or imitation), I stopped at this spot to have a snack (this is very close to the roadside "kiosko" on W side of road with the sign imploring the passersby to stop for a drink) and heard soisolas singing in wooded ravine by side of road (~3:30 PM). Went down into woods with SN and [illegible word] after whistling out in open seemed to bring the birds closer. I judge there were five or six birds calling, two or three of them being distant (or quietly singing females?).
All three song types were heard.
On one occasion as I was imitating the bird of part b and it was fairly close, another bird with a type 2 phrase but with an appreciably higher pitch sang very close to me. Unfortunately, just a moment before I had turned off the recorder and it never sang again so far as I noted. It was probably a male. Note: Some time before the first bird was collected, I noticed the birds were losing interest in my imitations ([song type]1 & 2) which were at same pitch they were using. I changed to a type 2 phrase at a higher pitch (therefore probably ~ same as of this birid) and interest immediately renewed, i.e. song activity increased. Was this a case of a possible female song bringing the males back into song again?

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