ML 64691

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Striped Cuckoo -- Tapera naevia More
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Note

 

 

Human Imitiation
 

 

 

Paul A Schwartz
7 Jul 1973 at 00:00

    Geography
  • Venezuela
    Carabobo
    Locality
  • Baqueron; Hacienda La Encastada
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 8.83   -68.92
    Elevation
  • 400 meters
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA UNSPECIFIED IV
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 405
    Accessories
  • Parabola 91.4cm (36in)
    Equipment Note

NOTES: Neotropical Institute Cut # 24. Bulk reel: 239
Weather: Fair. Experiment (see separate sheet for corresponding notes). In this recording I whistle female song (one- and two-figure drawn out) and bird (male) responds with male-type whistle, which brought variable results; however, reaction to female-type whistle was always the same. Quality: 2-, 1. Level: +3, +2, 0. 203 tape. Low noise.
Note re: Cut 24)
A bird was singing normal two-figure song. I whistled an imitation of that phrase ~ 3 times and bird became silent. I then whistled a long-drawn note and bird answered immediately with multi-figure phrase. Therefore, I prepared the recording equipment and meanwhile the bird (presumably male) resumed singing two-figure phrases but @ slightly faster rate of repetition. I then again tried whistling female song but bird went on singing two-figure phrases for three trials. I then whistled male two-figure and bird again became silent. When I whistled a single note female-type the bird again answered with multi-figure phrases but then failed to do so for three trials.
(Recording again here.) After a little delay I again tried and now the bird (male) responded always with multi-figure phraswes in complete duet with my whistled female song; I used both one-figure and two-figure drawn-out types. On several occasions in reaction to my whistle the bird flew over my head; on at least some of these he flew with fluttering wings. When perched he held the alulas pointed forward but without actively moving them and rocked body from side to side. Crest raised at least sometimes and bill wide open during display.
After some silence by me the bird resumed singing two-figure phrases but sang them quietly. I then whistled male two-figure song and bird flew toward me; this was repeated with same result. I then tried female song and bird immediately responded with multi-figure song.
This procedure was repeated numerous times with the same results except that bird sometimes did not react noticeably to my male-type whistle.

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