ML 63574

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Grassland Yellow-Finch -- Sicalis luteola More
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Paul A Schwartz
19 Aug 1974 at 00:00

    Geography
  • Venezuela
    Apure
    Locality
  • 10.0 km E of Guasdualito
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 7.25   -70.73
    Elevation
  • 100 meters
    Channels
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA UNSPECIFIED IV
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 405
    Accessories
  • Parabola 91.4cm (36in)
    Equipment Note

NOTES: Neotropical Institute Cut # 3. Bulk reel: 190Weather: Clear, fair. Time: 9:05 to 9:30 AM. Different recordings, sometimes of group of birds, others of single bird; all are similar to those of Cut 2 and involve same "population." Quality: 2 to 1-. Level: +2. 203 tape. LN.Notes re: Cuts 2 & 3) Several (one adult female, not breeding; one young male, not breeding; one probably young male, not breeding; and one unknown, not breeding) (juvenile skull not double layered) (all fresh plumage). (No adult male!!) of these birds were collected. They appear to correspond to some in the EBRG collection identified as S. luteola. This species is not indicated by Phelps for this region, or even near it, altough it is indic. for Colombia and general regions around so its occurrence here is not unusual.These birds were present in flocks or groups; one group counted had eleven, others had less (and probably others had more). These groups are not static. They move around while feeding and also may suddenly take off in manner suggesting they are departing for distant places but then they, or others, return. These seem to be post-nesting groups; they may be present here only migratorily.The vocalizations heard and recorded are not similar to those I experienced in SE Brazil (Cut 1), although occasionally in the "learning (?) singing" I hear something slightly suggestive of the "primary" sosngs. These vocalizations, considering the "off season" status of these birds, are most probably not primary song and thus the differences may not be significant taxonomically.[Note referring to last paragraph above]: Song heard at Cuare [Venezuela], July 1973, did resemble the song from Brazil (by memory comparison).

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