ML 63395

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Sooty Grassquit -- Tiaris fuliginosus More
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Natural
Playback Self
 

song

 

 

Paul A Schwartz
20 Sep 1974 at 00:00

    Geography
  • Venezuela
    Aragua
    Locality
  • Rancho Grande; km ~8 (new)
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 10.3666667   -67.6833333
    Elevation
  • 500 meters
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA UNSPECIFIED IV
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 405
    Accessories
  • Parabola 91.4cm (36in)
    Equipment Note

NOTES: Neotropical Institute Cut # 2. Bulk reel: 180Weather: Light cloudy. "Natural" song. Quality: 3. Level: +3. 203 tape. LN.At 7:55 AM I stopped by km 8 (just above the alcabala) to try to find T. obscura with the hope of finding a nest. My attention fell on a dark bird feeding in the Panicum maximum by side of road but immediately adjacent to the" wooded" area and with binoculars saw it was T. fuliginosa; it is a noticeably larger bird than T. obscura besides being "blackish" in color. It sang a little bit, song "drier" than that of T. obscura, but before I could set up equipment it had disappeared. Playback of the T. obscura field tape brought no apparent reaction.Some minutes later I heard it sing again, in the "wooded" area at side of road and with only approximate focus recorded some. A few minutes later it sang again and a bit more was recorded. Playback of this brought no apparent reaction, but a little later it sang again ~ 15 m. up road. I went there and played the recording and bird reacted definitely, coming out to dead bush at edge of "wooded" area, flicking its wings and calling, but did not sing, and soon went back into trees again. At ~ 3:30 it sang again briefly but after that I neither heard nor saw the bird again up to 9:30 when I left area.A couple times during the time when fuliginosa was still evident, an obscura came to the same area and in fact the last time fuliginosa sang it seemed to be in sort of response to the obscura's song. However, the fuliginosa seemed definitely to prefer the tree cover at all times and did not come out into the open as obscura does, the latter being an open-habitat bird.(Much traffic and river noise.)The last section recorded was probably after playback of the earlier recording, but not immediately so and there was no apparent reaction to playback of that poor recording.

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