ML 48832

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Fox Sparrow -- Passerella iliaca More
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Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

1 Adult Female
2 Adult Male  

100%

Sight and Sound

 

Natural
 

call

song

scold

fight

emit alarm

 

 

Kevin J Colver
12 Jun 1990 at 09:11

    Geography
  • United States
    California
    Locality
  • 6.0 km W of Sattley; Yuba Pass
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 39.6166667   -120.5
    Elevation
  • 2050 meters
    Habitats
  • Montane Grassland
  • Forest
  • Coniferous Forest
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • SONY TCD-D10
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser ME 20
    Accessories
  • Roché Parabola 60cm/14.5cm (23.6in/5.7in)
    Equipment Note

NOTES: (RRN#: 90-18-34-35; Species Sound: constant; Breeding Status: territorial; Sound Category: fighting; Sound Delivery Rate: agitated; General Climate: cyclic wet-dry; Cover Density: medium; Noise Reduction System: none; Filtering: yes) Two male Fox Sparrows had a vigorous physical fight on the ground, grabbing each other by bills and wrestling in the dust while the female jittered back and forth 1 foot away, calling and flicking her tail. The fight finally ended with one male chasing the other away. The victor then sang and called in an agitated manner from the ground and a 1-2m high pine tree. ****.

BNA: Male Song as well as Calls are heard. The Calls seem like male "Sip" Calls. I am not sure how to characterize the female call. CZ 18/05/2004

[A variety of vocalizations are included here. The first half of the recording contains mostly calls but also intermittent songs. Later in the recording, are mostly songs but with some calls. At least two and apparently three birds are singing here. Several different calls are also heard, but it is unclear which ones these are based on BNA account. There are certainly many "chink" calls (e.g., 0:47-1:24), but also what appear to be "sip" of "tsip" calls (e.g., 2:20-2:25, 2:42-2:45, 2:50-3:00), and probably other call-types not mentioned in account. A series of "chatters" (0:21-0:42), for example, is unlike anything described in BNA. Also likely is that each of these calls is different in the "Thick-billed" birds relative to nominate P. iliaca, upon which most of BNA discussion is based. Quality is highly variable (changed from 1 to 2-1, 1-2), with a relatively weak signal for most of the recording due to the soft calls. The best songs between 4:47 and 5:32 - CAM - 2 February 2005]

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