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Equus caballus caballus 5:06 - 6:45 Play 5:06 - More
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Walking through stream  

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100%

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Natural
 

 

 

Equus caballus caballus 15:00 - 17:00 Play 15:00 - More
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Walking through creek  

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Natural
 

 

 

Equus caballus caballus 1:00:00 - 1:01:20 Play 1:00:00 - More
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Walking, Breathing heavily  

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walk

make breath sounds

 

 

Interview 1:14:28 - 1:26:31 Play 1:14:28 - More
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Karsten Heuer  

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Banff National Park  

Interview 1:41:48 - 1:45:27 Play 1:41:48 - More
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Karsten Heuer  

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Banff National Park; Dormer Pass; Dormer cabin  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
26 Sep 1998

    Geography
  • Canada
    Alberta
    Locality
  • Banff National Park; Stony Creek
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 51.35108   -115.5951
    Recording TimeCode
  • :03 - 52:11
    Geography
  • Canada
    Alberta
    Locality
  • Banff National Park; Dormer Pass
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 51.44863   -115.5745
    Recording TimeCode
  • 52:19 - 1:49:37
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 40
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS Stereo

NPR/NGS RADIO EXPEDITIONS Y2Y DAT#5
Ambi -02:00 -04:43 Horses walking on trail [stream in background] dry trail-not too many stones [ ok]
Ambi,.... 05:06 -06:45 Walking on horses by stream -and into stream -and out of stream and back onto trail [G]
Ambi -08:00 -09:00 Walking by stream on horses [not into it] then away ...... .
Ambi -09:00 -12:00 [+ more walking until Horses walking on rocky dry sounding trail, stream quite far away and fades away.
Ambi 15:00 -17:00 Horses kind of stumbling along, then approach to river and walk through river [VG]
Ambi 17:50 -19:00 [+ more until 28:00] Horses walking on rough grade with rocky sound [VG]
AC: 28:27 -29:40 We've been going about two hours now, and we've moved a lot farther up this valley We've just taken a little stop now for lunch. I'm looking a little ahead now to where we're going to go later, there's a mountain in front on us -Granite. The snow has fallen last night and it's left these streaks of white that follow the grain of rock and you can see the grain standing out clearly like a big swirl moving from the top of the mountain down to the bottom. It's just a spectacular sight. Over on the west side, steep line of trees going up, grassy meadow, then spectacular sharp rocky mountain peaks, a couple of thousand feet above us. Saw two golden eagles -migrating south ....

AC: 31:08 -31:40 + Ambi to 31:58 We're headed over Dormer Pass. We've just had lunch Halfway. KH: We've been following Stoney Creek up. You guys timed it perfectly. Great fall bi colors, clear blue sky above, be breezy over the pass. Potentially see some wildlife. [NG]
Ambi -34:00 -39:25 [not great] More walking on horseback. [quiet and not very active] Very quiet bed -begin to approach stream around 36:30 -then down to stream FX : 37:24 Horse blow as horse is walking on trail.
Ambi in pine brush and pine trees, starting to climb up mountain in afternoon
40:25 -41:30 then Alex describes as walking along [no good] until come to a stream [no good]

Ambi -more walking along to 53:14
53:14 -54:09 + ambi to 54:45 AC: Karsten, where are we? KH We're about half an hour below Dormer Pass on the south side. You're going to be blown away -we're going to break out of the trees, big open grassy slopes above us, then shrub meadows, and the pass isn't just a pass which you just go over. It sort of extends for a period of time like a tunnel -mountains off to either side. Often where you'll see biggest sheep in this park. Then things will start to get a little more rugged as go down the other side ..... drop down to lower meadows.
Chatter then rustling and adjustment of paniers on pack horse 55:24 -56:40 KH: Ok that's it. [off mic] + Perky: They always say the smaller the diamond, the better.
Ambi 59:05 -59:30 [might be good little punctuation clucking to horse, and horse moving along
1:01:58 - 1:01:20 Ambi -back on the trail-horses sounding tired and puffing a lot [G]

1:01:58 -1:02:330 + ambi with horses puffing to 1:02:46 AC: We're quite near the top of Dormer Pass, and there's kind of a bowl over on the east side. We're just above the tree line, and down below, ground bowls around, and then back up into this incredible range of rock dusted with snow on top, lot of shale falling down, there's a little meadow down in the bottom, a stand of trees.
Ambi 1:04:00 -1:05:00 Lead in ambience to Karsten interview [NG in beginning because talking]
AC: 1:05:00 -1:06:34 This is beautiful little swale ....8'000 feet. This is Dormer Pass. There's a big peak on the right, steep hillside on the left, we're running north. In places on the hillside, the shale has broken loose, and there are big slide areas of crumbled stone. Cliff face, snow, light dusting of snow in places,
AC: 1:06:48 -1:07:56 + horses walking 1:08:15 It's just 3:30 in the afternoon. We're finally at Dormer Pass, and it's not at all what I expected. This is 8,000 feet, but it' kind a gentle little meadow here between a couple of taller peaks. There are a few pines, but mostly it's just low grass. It feels just gentle and calm and you wouldn't know you were way up in the mountains. The sky all around us is just clear blue as can be, deep blue, no clouds. Yesterday at this time, we were coming up Elk Creek, and it was raining, and cold, and snowing a little bit, and we were pretty uncomfortable. This afternoon it's absolutely beautiful. But they say the steep part is up ahead going down. + ambi to 1:08:55
ambi 1:09:20 -1:09:50 VG ambi walking along on horses
Ambi 1:11:30 -1:12:00 Getting off the horse [ ok]
Interview with Karsten at Dormer Pass [1:14:29 -1:26:13] AC:: When was the first time you came here? KH: About four years ago. On foot, not on horseback, and when I came over this first shoulder here, there were about 40 rams, big sheep, and we literally had to clap our hands to get them out of the way ..... . AC: When did the idea of walking all this first occur to you? KH: It first occurred when I was doing research down in the Bow Valley in an area that is lower than this, in the montaine, you can see here we're in September and it's snowy. You can imagine what it's like in the winter, there's about 10 feet of snow. But down in the montagne -get all the animals down there, and what I was studying was how the movement of animals was constricted by development within the mountains ....and a number of things came out of the study that led to some restoration in the area, removal of human development to open it up for wildlife movement, but knowing how far things like wolves, cougars, grizzlies and lynx range, I knew we could be doing everything we'd want in the Bow Valley, but it would only just be part of the area these animals needed. They needed places like Nest Pass to also be open for their movement. So I started thinking about some of the scale that they consider the landscape, and was naturally attracted to this Yellowstone 2 Yukon idea, which had just started and was beginning to coalesce into this network of activists and scientists. That was about two years ago. [1:16:26]
AC: Two years ago you got the idea that you could walk from Yellowstone to Yukon KH: Well, the first presentation I went to by Harvey Locke I was pretty inspired, and most people there were too, Started to see that happening, and I thought this is almost an intuitive concept of the type of scale of the landscape we should be thinking about. People need to hear it, strikes intuitive chord, way more people need to hear about this, what's a good way of letting more people know about it, so I thought, you know I'm naturally attracted to adventure, and have never had an easy life of being inside or sedentary so I thought how can I tie together adventure that would both be satisfying to myself but also attract people who otherwise wouldn't be concerned by a conservation message like Y2Y.

1:17:20 AC: You thought if I walk this whole distance, people are going to say hey, that's a hell of a trip for some guy to go on foot. KH: That's definitely been one of the reactions, so you capture their attention initially, And then I always try to steer it back to what I'm trying to symbolize, and what I'm trying to symbolize is how an animal and a wary animal like a grizzly bear or a wolf would be connecting these different protected areas from Yellowstone to the Yukon. [1:17:52]
AC: You said earlier you planned this route out by thinking how would a bear move from Y 2 Y, and that's why we're here in this Pass, that's the kind of route a bear would take
. .
KH: Actually, the Cascade Valley where we started today is probably one of the richest areas for bear habitat and bear activity in Banff National Park, and this particular pass, bears are commonly sighted traveling through here and , and down north into the Dormer and Panther, we'll see nothing but bear activity as well. [1: 18:25]
AC: What strikes me, it's funny to me that a bear would be using the same trail that we are. This is a pack trail. KH: What we've actually seen is that once you open up a trail in a valley ... bears, all animals are smart, and they're not going to be going over deadfall and through creeks if an easy trail exists so I think if we didn't have a cut trail up through the forest we just came through, we'd probably have a lot more game trails in that particular valley, because the wildlife would still be motivated to move through here. And certainly in an open area like this, the bear wouldn't be stepping through every footfall, might be over there...... [1: 19: 19] this idea of symbolizing grizzly bear movement, it' s not exact, but generally I'm trying to go through same sorts of valleys and connections in terms of high mountain passes and also encountering some of the barriers that they might be encountering as they might be going from Yellowstone to Yukon, so the route so far has probably been a lot more remote and a lot more difficult than it would have to be if! wasn't so concerned about going to these areas where bears, wolves and wolverine would be going through. [1:19:51]
AC: You could walk an easier route than the one you've chosen. KH: [laughter] ....Definitely. [1:20:00]
AC: How old are you now? KH: 29, going to be 30 by the end of this month. AC: How long have you been a naturalist? KH: Probably at a deeper level, since I was a kid. My father was one of these fanatical fishermen who would drag out the whole family every Friday from the city, load them in the van, drive most of the night and then get everyone up at 4 am hiking boots on even if it was raining and hike in the dark up to some lake so you'd be right there at the first pale gray of dawn to put in that first cast for the best fishing opportunity, so I guess you go
through a lot of experiences as a kid and it has an impression on you. [1 :20:46] So everything from my schooling to my work has kind of revolved around the outdoors and the mountains [1:21:00]

KH: We're at 7,680 feet. .... altimeter on watch ... . AC: You don't always know where you're going ... haven't walked the whole route before. KH: There was a lot of map dreaming in the winter, looking at maps and trying to visualize what the landscape was like, visualize from maps, slopes valleys, distances, did a fair amount of detailed route work in terms of how long it would take me to travel certain distances, and I actually counted each contour, lines that indicate every 100 feet of elevation, rough equation of guessing how long it would take me to travel ...
How figured out schedule for presentations.
AC: Kept to route planned out? KH: Been extremely lucky. Think back to how much sort of winging it when making plan, and hoping these trails existed. Lucky cuz of weather .... beautiful weather, only thing that has rerouted me in a few spots and I've had to consider -had to dodge a couple of ores fires, cuz such a dry summer , areas closed because of bear maulings.
AC: Not sure people listening to this, would think you could keep going .... . Sounds like you're determined to get from the beginning to middle to end .... . KH: [1:24:30] Guess so, pretty sure going to get to the Yukon, but the detailed planning For the northern section has not occurred. Should be looking at 1 to 50,000 maps to make sure for instance the ski route that we're proposing to do from Jasper for five weeks north this winter is feasible .... consider what other people have done, what been able to do with friends ... .long as exhibit certain level of caution and you're not pushing yourself and making silly judgment calls, I think just about anything is possible ... might be delayed by avalanches and weather but as long as have a bit of flexibility and intend to build a lot more flexibility in the schedule north of Jasper, and are patient and are willing to endure hardship every once in awhile, you have to realize hardship is always temporary, and I think that's what goes through my mind every time I find myself in a situation where I'm uncomfortable or in pain, it's just temporary. Yesterday we came over the pass, and everybody was cold, it was snowing, it was wet, it was probably conditions that bring about hypothermia most ofien hovering around zero, you're wet and cold, it was temporary. Look at today, we're in shirt sleeves on top of a pass, there's snow around us, but you can lie in the grass and fall asleep here, it's so nice and warm and sunny. [1 :26: 13]
Ambi 1:27:04 -1:27:45 Ambience from interview with Karsten on Dormer Pass]
AC: Time to get back on Chico ... going to ride on

Ambi: 1:28:27 -1:28:32 a bit of windy ambi for cover
Ambi -1:29:32 -1:33:30 Ambi after interview on Dormer -little trotting as move off, Alex describes coming down descent from Pass [off mic] crossed a long section of steep shale ....reached meadows with peaks around us. Spotted mountain sheep. More walking along ambi. ... trotting. 1:32:09 -turn around in polarity from back to front ..... walking along
Ambi 1:34:00 -1:36:35 [NG] Spotting rams
**Ambi 1 :36:36 -1 :37:39 [VG] short approach to stream and very short but good horse crossing on rocks/stream and onto trail [1:37:39 + more ambi on trail [no]
Ambi 1:40:20 -1:41:42 On trail into Dormer Cabin
1:41:50 -1:43:00 KH: Welcome to Dormer Cabin .... Ambi -people milling around, getting off horses, horse blows, [ok] bridle sounds, horses chomping, people walking around, 1 :44 :20 -walking onto steps of cabin and opening up. KH: You don't want to go knocking at this door ..the front of this door is full of spikes, and all the shutters are as well, you can see below each window, there's a pad that has all these spikes poking through, and all for preventing bears from breaking into cabins. This cabin's pretty notorious for having bears breaking in, and that tree where Perky's horse tied to is pretty well used rub tree. There's been people in this cabin and looked out the door, and there's been a grizzly bear rubbing up against that tree. [1:45:18] So when go out at night have a good look around before step off this porch.
AX -1:45:39 -1:49:30 AC: about 10:00. My butts ok, but my knees, I need younger knees. Perky, what are we going to do with horses tonight. Perky, put down in pen ....others around cabin .... Horses hobbled, drift fence ....
STOP DOWN and END

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