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Interview 9:19 - 12:46 Play 9:19 - More
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Harvey Locke  

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Y2Y; Yellowstone-to-Yukon; Northern Rocky Mountains conservation  

Interview 13:04 - 36:53 Play 13:04 - More
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Karsten Heuer  

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Y2Y; Yellowstone-to-Yukon; Northern Rocky Mountains conservation  

Interview 37:22 - 40:14 Play 37:22 - More
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Bruce Leeson  

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Y2Y; Yellowstone-to-Yukon; Northern Rocky Mountains conservation  

Interview 41:42 - 45:35 Play 41:42 - More
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Harvey Locke  

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Y2Y; Yellowstone-to-Yukon; Northern Rocky Mountains conservation  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
24 Sep 1998

    Geography
  • Canada
    Alberta
    Locality
  • Calgary; Calgary Public Library
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 51.041702   -114.06827
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
  • Sennheiser MKH 40
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS Stereo

NPR / National Geographic Society RADIO EXPEDITIONS
Y2Y DAT2

KH = Karsten Heuer
BL = Bruce Leeson

9/24/98 Calgary Public Lib. Karsten Heuer's Presentation
:35--3:32
ambi, people talking, constant chatter
3:32 ac
level check. ..on a Thursday night in Calgary 60 miles east of Banff .. repeats (background chatter is very loud ...
many stops and starts 5:40 standup 5:49 pause and pick-up at beginning.
7:15 ct pick-up. beginning presentation starting late 7:40 pm
chatter 9:09 applause.
9:19 hi Harvey lock speaking; introductions and applause ---13:03
Karsten Heuer speaks
18:38 (presented to Maxine) check in the amount of 9000 dollars ** applause
20:34 ct
stop down
21:00 kh
major impediment crow's nest pass area and the bow valley area ...three things first of all major human pop v close by pop of Calgary, recreational pressure 2) topography regulating into natural movement patterns, already naturally restricted 3) nat transportation corridors
questions from audience ...
talking about humans as food source for grizzlies.
Talking about man killed by bear. *
presentation ends at 37:04
intv with Bruce Leeson, sr environmental assessment scientist for the Alberta region of parks Canada; in charge of y2y for parks Canada.
Audience talking in background
37:51 ac ify2y were to come to fruition what difference would that make for parks Canada?
37:56 bl well right at this instance I can't say what would be diff after all we've been in the environmental conservation business for 113 yrs so we'll certainly carry on doing the best things that we have we recog that we manage some of the key properties in y2y and we'll be taking v special care of those we'll watching to see what y2y is a;; about and determine whether there is anything that we could be doing in addition bc in concept we endorse them.
Ac Asks about parks Canada conversations w us counterparts?
38:39 bl that's just been ratified in recent agreement that the us nat park service and parks Canada are going to collaborate specifically on the sub ofy2y bc they too recognize their management of these critical properties Yellowstone ecosystem contiguous to ours in glacier so you bet we're going to be collaborating together to make sure that we can do things stronger than we can individually.
Alex asks about speed with which y2y idea has grown; acceptance wfl park service
39:40 bl well it sure is that such an agreement memorandum of agreement would come about so quickly on a new concept like this. But on the other hand when you look at what the y2y is proposing its our business so if we we weren't there to quickly part. In the leadership well that would say something not so favorable about us.
40:05 (audience chattering in background) stopdown
Harvey Locke one of the founders of the y2y conservation initiative involved w both V.p. as cpaws of wildlands project ac--first spoke with you a yr ago at waterton conference since then what has happened?
42:08 hi
we've experienced a marvelous explosion of interest and energy around the concept. The launch that we had last yr in waterton really caught a lot of people's imagination and we've seen tangible things like this personal pilgrimage up the system as a way of putting a face on the idea -we now have an agreement signed by the park services of the us and Canada saying at least as their land, part of the land base goes they'll work on that as a joint international priority which is a very good thing we have sort of growing awareness which is really our fundamental goal that we really are in a shared landscape and that the 49th parallel is very much a line that we laid d on the landscape that ignores an ecological reality and I think what's beginning to happen too is that the myth of Canada as this vast cornucopia of wildlife that's just waiting to stampede over the border and make up for any mistakes in wildlife management that goes on in the united states has been heavily dispelled as people see the sort of maps of where the impacts of humanity are and how the line is really from significantly to the north of us-Canada border ... and what we're going to have to do together as two countries is figure out a way to keep the links that are pretty tenuous alive btwn parks like Banff and glacier and to restore the links btwn glacier and Yellowstone if we want to maintain the animals that share the system and that call the system home. 43:37
43:41 ac
Alex talks about karsten traveling 1500 km and encountering only 7 major roads, would have thought there would be more.
44:18 hi
well the marvelous thing about the Yellowstone to Yukon area is that in a very real sense its the wild heart of the continent, its the place that most intact where all the things that belong are still there. they're still there in the system and yet so are we as humans in increasing number there. and our technologies and consumptive patterns are encroaching increasingly on it. but we still have basically these seven major railroads and roads that cut east-west which sort of cut across the natural grain of the country which is very strongly north-south and while that presents a relatively intact landscape by northern American standards especially settled north American standards, it also presents a unique obstacle for in the sense that the grain of the country for nature is north-south and the nature of our movements across the country are east-west and we're going to have to figure out a way to make our movements accommodate nature's movements or we're going to lose nature, we're not at any risk of being lost out of this system. its really a question of whether we're going to share this landscape with the magnificent animals such as the grizzly bear and the wolf. 45:28 (audience die-down)
46:26 stopdown.
END OF DAT

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