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Environmental Recording :43 - 31:57 Play :43 - More
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Environmental Recording 31:58 - 1:37:57 Play 31:58 - More
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Quiet dawn ambi  

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red howler monkey -- Alouatta seniculus 46:00 - 55:16 Play 46:00 - More
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Environmental Recording 1:37:57 - 1:42:41 Play 1:37:57 - More
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Interview 1:42:54 - 2:05:58 Play 1:42:54 - More
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Rex Cocroft  

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Treehoppers; Membracidae  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
31 Oct 2005

    Geography
  • Ecuador
    Orellana
    Locality
  • Tiputini Biodiversity Station
    Latitude/Longitude
  • -0.637633   -76.150389
    Recording TimeCode
  • 1:02:00 - 1:58:15
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
  • Sennheiser MKH 50
  • Sennheiser MKH 20
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=2; 1=L, 2=R; Spaced Omni Stereo using DPA 4060 to 0:20:05; Spaced Omni Stereo using MKH 20 to 0:31:57; Decoded MS Stereo to 1:42:41; Spaced Omni Stereo using MKH 20 to end

Radio Expeditions Log
Story: Tiputini - Rex Cocroft
DAT #11
Date recorded/logged November 1, 2005, Tiputini Biodiversity Station
Logged by: Carolyn Jensen
Recorded by: Flawn Williams
Reporter: Alex Chadwick

RC = Rex Cocroft
AC = Alex Chadwick
FW = Flawn Williams

DAT 11: Monday afternoon Oct 31
DPA mikes: Flawn solo walk to Lake tower.
00000 Along the Lago trail, forest ambi near river
00048 ***** switch to high gain, set DPAs on a tree (they're on double wire flex mount) nice single owlish bird, clatter from occasional water droplets and falling leaves. Cricket also dominant at times.
00317 clatter increases a bit; I unzip bag
00340 back anc first ambi
00400 second Lago trail ambi, standing on log bridge. Multiple owlish birds, woodpeckerish sound, some water flow sounds as well, distant crickets/frogs/cicadas, occasional stomach gurgles from FW
00538 ***** reposition a bit, then more ambi at same location, two birds duetting, louder water
00645 new bird enters the mix
00800 ***** pair of very strident birds passes quickly through the scene
00905 FW back announces second location
00943 FW setup top of 130-foot tower at lagoon along Anaconda trail
01000 ***** great close bird, and many others, plus woodpeckerish sounds (or hammering?)
01130 frogs start singing in chorus, birds and peckers continue
01233 new active birds in distance
01440 ***** another rise of frog chorus, some closer birds
01610 ***** a few calls from a VERY close bird with good continuing background
01705 a little sense of generator or motor in far distance?
01730 ***** birds and frogs get more active, nearby fly fly by, frogs get even louder
01940 Flawn back annc tower ambi
02020 (spaced stereo 20s) intermittent right ch before slate of next ambi
02100 ***** Late night ambi at cabin 16 porch: cicadas, frogs, birds, occasional turbulent moths
(will need filtering to remove generator hum)
03140 Flawn back anc previous track
03200 slate Tuesday morning 4:50am MS Matapalo trail forest ambi at about 100 meters into forest
03330 ***** fairly quiet, some dewfall leaf clatter, great potoo bird in distance with 8-6-5-3 pattern, close flying thing, then a repeated low pitched sighing call almost like snoring
03620 stopping down
03640 ***** further into forest, about 5am, closer to low pitched sighing animal from previous track
04110 ***** more at same site, now on tripod, low sighing and dewfall dominate
04420 5:33 am: set for MS howler monkeys and dawn chorus birds at Matapalo 660m
04450 ***** some dewfall clatter, birds, frog, more birds
04600 howler monkey alpha male starts vocalizing. Reposition mike to aim at right tree.
04700 ***** closer centered howler monkey alpha male vocalizing, with birds and dewfall
05015 ***** loud crash of something dropping from treetop, vocalizing continues
05450 repositioning mike again
05510 howler is done vocalizing. Dawn chorus birds continue and get stronger. Dewfall continues.

13757 Tuesday After breakfast: saki monkeys(?) and Oropendola from cabin 16 porch, spaced 20s

14241 Start Lago trail walk with Rex and Lin, some talk, some sound (20s)
Logging from Carolyn of trail walk section:

MULTIPLE AMBIENCE PRECEDE THIS:

1:44:00 + Heading out to the Lago Trail with Rex Cocroft, Lin, Alex Chadwick and Flawn Williams

1:45: 27 RC: The overall diversity seems to be lower in this frequently flooded forest, but right at this spot there's one very large ant colony, and practically every stem with new growth around here has one or more groups of membracids¿..[rummaging around]
RC: 1:46: 08 This is a really great area, We should spend a little time just looking around here. AC: Okay. 1:46:15 plus ambi of looking around. Lin enters the scene.

ID: Chung Ping Lin, from Tunghai University in central part of Taiwan, Assistant Professor in the Department of Life Science

1:51:31 AC: Yah, here's one walking up, he's got a huge tail. Yah, I remember. These are the ones that you photographed, sort of green and he's crawling down the other side here.

RC: Got a long tube ¿.move it around and present it to the ant. Some people if they were to use an indelicate phrase to describe this plant might say it was "vested" with membracids, but of course that is not the term you would use. Better: "inhabited by, graced by" would be more appropriate. Here's a group of about 30, star nymphs, another group of 30 or 40, another group, just very small. Often do look like a part of the plant. Here's an adult female on her egg mass. [**This all sounds very intimate and good].
Practically anywhere you look, and it's reflecting the fact that although there are lots of plants here, the one thing they are limited by is mutualists, the presence of ants can have a huge impact on their fitness. People have shown in study after study that if you exclude the ants from a plant with a group of developing membracids on it, their rate of mortality from predation just skyrockets, so it may increase a 1000% without the ants there. So those ants form a very important resource, and having done a survey of the ants here, my impression is ants lower¿¿etc.

RC: Now where was that one you found Alex¿..There he is¿..
1:55:28 Interested in trying to record that one¿.collect a little plant stem, put him on there and take him back to the Lab.

AC: Some of these stems that we see are sort of like small villages, but this one's more like a mid-sized city. There's a lot going on there. [1:56:18]

[Dr Cocroft is about to fall into the Tiputini River¿.]

1:58:32 RC: *Try to find that same nymph we were looking at earlier. AC: Very good, Rex, you just plucked him off that stem, transferred him to this one, and he hasn't hopped off.

RC: These insects, if you can keep a part of a plant, insects are usually pretty happy. That's their whole world, essentially. They live on the surface of the plant the way we live on the ground, and almost never leave it, except briefly to fly between one plant and another once they become adults. [1:59:21]

AC: Well, I think this guy is one extremely handsome membracid with a very interesting anterior structure.

RC: Definitely developing an eye for membracids. Honestly it's a bit like developing an eye for art. The aesthetic pleasure to be gained from something like this is there, to be able to appreciate even the differences between species, to know how to look at an insect,
What the parts are. I remember a biologist who was studying very brown weevils, he was just enthralled with them¿.get that kind of high¿..
It's true when you start studying any species, or group of species. They're just marvelous, and the more you understand about them, the more fascinating and even beautiful they become. [2:00:39] So I can see that you're getting there by describing this as a very handsome membracid. [2:00:45]

[Backing into plant and getting lots of ants - indicates their protective nature]

2:02:23 RC: These are some stems that I brought back to the lab the other day and made some really interesting recordings from and now I'm returning them¿..

2:03:13: ****AC: When you talk about the aesthetic qualities of these membracids, I think that you mean how physically striking and beautiful they are, but there is also the aesthetic quality of how they sound.

RC: Yes, So at a first glance you see that some of them are beautifully colored or beautifully shaped or just fascinating in some respect, and that's before you ever listen to them. But yes, there is this entirely other aspect that comes through very different senses
of their communication signals, and their social signals are very interesting, you can hear these very intense social interactions going on, and their mating signals are often maybe in some cases very beautiful or in some cases very eerie or surprising or even humorous to our ears, but a rich complex set of sounds. [2:04:20[

AC: Why is it that a signal from one membracid to another, especially one membracid that's courting another would evoke in us a sense of wonder, or mournfulness or a sense of understanding. Don't you hear something in there?

RC: You certainly do. On the one hand, the intellectual aspect of why they are sing that kind of signal, how those signals evolve, whether a female¿.At the same time, great unacknowledged pleasure from the research is these kinds of responses of wonder and awe that are evoked, and I think that what makes the sounds of these insects particularly evocative for us is that unlike the sounds ¿¿!!!!!!! [2:06:03] Change tape¿.

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