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Environmental Recording :04 - 48:08 Play :04 - More
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Rain, Rainstorm  

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Environmental Recording 48:27 - 1:08:16 Play 48:27 - More
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Rain, Thunder  

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Environmental Recording 1:10:08 - 1:47:40 Play 1:10:08 - More
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Rain drops, Dripping rain  

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Interview 1:15:23 - 1:43:06 Play 1:15:23 - More
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Rex Cocroft  

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Treehoppers; Membracidae  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
31 Oct 2005

    Geography
  • Ecuador
    Orellana
    Locality
  • Tiputini Biodiversity Station
    Latitude/Longitude
  • -0.637633   -76.150389
    Recording TimeCode
  • 1:02:00 - 1:58:15
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 20
  • Sennheiser MKH 50
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Decoded MS Stereo to 0:48:08; Spaced Omni Stereo using MKH 20 to 1:09:18; Spaced Omni Stereo using DPA 4060 to end

Ecuador DAT Log 10

Key:
DPAs: twin DPA 4060 omnis head=spaced
MS: undecoded mid-side with MKH50 hypercardioid mid, MKH30 fig8 side
20s: split track or spaced stereo with twin MKH20 omnis

RC = Rex Cocroft
AC = Alex Chadwick
FW = Flawn Williams

DAT 10: Monday Oct 31 morning
00000 *****MS rainstorm off cabin 11 porch continued: heavy,
00645 then lighter, good drips and plops
01450 then heavier again
04145 still chugging along in MS with good rain and occasional thunder
04840 ***** After breakfast, lighter rain and good thunder with spaced 20s omnis
10600 ***** thunder roll with moderate rain
10820 FW b/anc various types of rain and thunder and one Oropendola bird
10918 Switch to DPA omnis on single wire mount for Flawn umbrella walk with Rex to treefall to record raindrops thru pickup(these are Rex 1031 files 14-17)
11010 ***** rain on umbrella at quiet camp with DPAs under umbrella, occasional bird
11212 Alex gives Rex bigger umbrella, RC and FW set off down the trail, wet footsteps and umbrella popcorn
11310 ***** RC quick stop at plants in camp, then walk on into forest, more indirect drops, less umbrella
11500 ***** some closer footsteps
11520 RC: It looks like they've completely gone from that one stem. Some of them moved over here. Most of the ones we recorded yesterday have dispersed.
FX zipper bag
11600 RC: ***** I'm getting out my recording gear because I want to record what the rain sounds like from the insects' perspective.
11700 FX setting up gear, zipping bag shut.
11750 RC: OK, I've got recorder and amplifier connected, I'm going to attach the accelerometer to the stem right next to this aggregation of insects.
11845 RC: I don't hear the rain. Move the umbrellas back. And, uh...WOW. It sounds about like the rain on your umbrella if the drops were sort of the size of baseballs?
11930 RC: The insects themselves are completely quiet.
12140 RC: ***** Although it's raining steadily there are so many layers of leaves between us and the sky, we're actually not getting any direct rainfall on these plants. So instead, what we're getting are occasional drops dripping down from branches and leaves higher up in the canopy.
12245 RC: I believe the leaf area index for forests like this is about seven. That is, as you go from the ground up to the sky you're gonna pass through, on average, seven different levels of leaves. And this really dramatically illustrates that. Because we're getting absolutely no direct rain at all.
(12325 Rex notices he isn't recording yet, starts recording, NEW file 15, note there's an older file 15 too!)
12425 ambi while Rex records raindrops on leaves with accelerometer
12825 RC: I'm gonna record a bit more. This is fairly sporadic, so there are fairly long stretches where nothing's happening. So if you were to use this I think you'd have to wait for those times when there's a flurry of drops and those only come every minute or so.
13200 RC: I'll just note that this is the same group of insects that we were recording yesterday. There were two groups, one on each of two stems. One of the groups has now dispersed completely, and in the other group, most of the individuals are still there. (Pause) We could try to see if we could get them to call, but so far they've been completely unresponsive, and it may be that their responses are kind of shut down by the rain. So...whoa...yikes...here's a periplonera ant just about a foot from where the accelerometer was. These are the ones that are supposed to have an excruciating sting, and are about an inch long.
(RC and FW confer)
13500 FX footsteps back along trail
13803 Back at camp, still DPAs, recording direct rain with pickup (as opposed to leaf drip indirect rain at treefall)
13915 RC: Now I'm just going to attach the accelerometer to a leafy branch that's out in the clearing exposed to direct light rain that we're having, to record the sound of rain directly on the leaves. This will be Track 017.
FX: louder raindrops on umbrella; nice Oropendola bird solo calls
14210 ***** RC: These vibrationally communicating insects are exposed to a tremendous dynamic range so they're having to listen to, maybe, the delicate footfalls of a predator or the very quiet signals from another member of their group who might be a tenth of an inch long, to these cannonshots of raindrops. They're having to distinguish signals over that whole range.
(RC and FW confer)
14350 ***** FX walking through puddles (DPAs)
14738 tape 10 ends

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