ML 161614

AudioDateDownLeftRightUpCloseReportGallerySettingsGiftLanguageGridListMapMenuPhotoPlayPlusSearchStarUserVideo

Interview :35 - 16:16 Play :35 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Harry Roberts  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Hurricane Katrina  

Sound Effects 26:51 - 31:20 Play 26:51 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Airplane start up, Aiplane Idle  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Sound Effects 41:30 - 41:33 Play 41:30 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Business telephone ringing  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Sound Effects 1:07:35 - 1:11:57 Play 1:07:35 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Airport tarmac sounds  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Sound Effects 1:16:56 - 1:17:29 Play 1:16:56 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Helicopter  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
15 Sep 2005

    Geography
  • United States
    Louisiana
    East Baton Rouge County
    Locality
  • Baton Rouge; Baton Rouge Metropolitan Airport, South Ramp; Louisiana Aircraft LLC
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 30.525   -91.148
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Two-Channel Mono

Show: Louisiana Swamps
Date: 09/15/05

HR = Harry Roberts
CJ = Chris Joyce
JG = Jessica Goldstein

HR: Directions to pilots...
Seeing algal bloom in Lake Pontchartrain.
Directions to pilots...

3:35
HR: But I think you'll see that when we review the damage, that really most of the visible is out here along these barrier islands. This was a consistent barrier island arc just like it shows on this map prior to this storm.

CJ: sort of a crescent shape

HR: And it represents the distal end or the seaward end of an old delta that built out in this space about 3000 yrs ago and so these islands represent the reworked end of that old delta. And the rest of the delta has subsided out of sight and that's we have this big open water area here. But that island arc sort of marks the seaward end of that once active delta that was active just like this one that we call the birdfoot delta.
4:36
HR: So we should see all the elements. And the worst areas that were affected by the storm and that's the reason for the flight.

Informal conversation with pilot, CJ.

5:30
HR: Boat which they had to get out of Chalmette.
6:30
HR: Still talking about getting boat to Baton Rouge. River packed with large ships anchored along banks.

7:20
HR: But this was an interesting storm. You it, I think- We have weathered so many tough storms in Louisiana that people get complacent, but now, with all the pre-storm activity and images that people can look at, it was pretty evident to all the scientific community that this was going to be a really severe storm and a very hard hit on coastal Louisiana. We have all expected that if the perfect storm came up to the right side of New Orleans and literally put a wall of water into Lake Pontchartrain that New Orleans would have a real problem and that's exactly what happened and if you look at this map, the storm surge came up from this direction, the southeast.

8:19
CJ: Say that again.
8:23
HR: It came up from the southeast see the storm track was basically north, so the storm surge was being pushed from that right quadrant into New Orleans and into Lake Pontchartrain. This is high ground comparatively.
...
8:55
HR:...and then the levees of the miss river it forms a "V". And so when that storm surge came in adjacent to Chalmette it got amplified because of these two high areas. So it amplified the storm surge and pushed it right into the city of New Orleans. And that's where the breach is if you look where the breaches in the levees occur, it's opposite this V, which just literally focused that storm surge right into the city.
9:24

CJ: kind of like a funnel

9:25
HR: Like a funnel, except rather than just funneling the water, it increased the height of the water. As that surge came in.
9:35

CJ: Like the bay of fundi.
HR: bonds with CJ over the Bay of Fundi analogy.

10:00
HR: So it was a not The perfect storm. But it was a near perfect storm and it certainly caused the damage that many in the scientific community have predicted for years and years would happen if we got a storm like this. And it certainly proved a lot of our previous thinking and a lot of our models of how new Orleans and the surrounding area would react to a storm of this magnitude.
10:36

CJ: storm logistics.

11:17
HR: Well, you have to be on the quadrant that gets the strongest winds. Plus there's a pressure effect. That you know the low pressure literally sucks the water level's surface up. So you get an increase in the hight of that surge not only from the winds, but also from the pressure differential. So its uh, in this case, almost a perfect situation for giving new Orleans a problem. New Orleans is slow though, in terms of topography, even if storm had come in from west...
12:04

CJ, HR talk abt MISTIGO.

12:50
HR: ...This surge of water came in at the right angle, it had the right height, and it was amplified by these geomorphic guides that we talked about earlier. The levees of the Misss R to the south and the high ground along the shores of LP to the north and to the east. And so that storm surge just literally funneled into that area and was amplified and spilled right into the city.
13:20

CJ: and didn't disperse.

13:27
HR: and the levees as you know the levees breached and that is what caused the major flooding problem was the breach in the levees and allowing the surrounding flood waters to just filter into the city.
13:47

CJ: what do you expect to see in marshes.

14:18
HR: the uh wetlands even though they are not they are more resilient than the sandy barrier islands, they still take a hit during a storm like this. You cant bring a storm with that kind of intensity in and not expect the perimeter of the marsh and even the interior of the marsh to be eroded. Now, the marshes are seeded on fine grain sediment. Muds, primarily. And muds are very hard to erode compared to sands. So the barrier islands which are composed of sands are easy to erode and they disappear very rapidly in a storm like this. Now they do rebuild, but there's always a net loss of sediment. And they are literally living on their own sediment now so every storm impact like Kat, is a net loss to the supply of sand for rebuilding these islands. In the marshlands, the same thing

-incomplete log-

Close Title