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Interview :41 - 15:14 Play :41 - More
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Unidentified man, Elizabeth Arnold  

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Discussing a bear sighting  

Interview 18:14 - 47:02 Play 18:14 - More
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Unidentified man, Elizabeth Arnold  

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Discussing caribou  

Interview 50:46 - 1:19:31 Play 50:46 - More
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Unidentified man, Elizabeth Arnold  

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Wilderness Area discussions  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
15 Aug 2004

    Geography
  • United States
    Alaska
    Yukon-Koyukuk County
    Locality
  • Unidentified lake
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 66.913333   -151.5225
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • DPA4060 spaced omni mics.

NPR/NGS RADIO EXPEDITIONS
Show: Alaska
Engineer: Bill McQuay
Date:08/14/2004

Elizabeth Arnold (Spaced omnis)
0:44 asking about bear . .is he up in the gravel? ..
1:55 see the main avalanche shoot then go down, a smaller chute ..other side of the willow, yes. Oh he's right on top of the kill there .. ooh. **
10:101 generally avoid the brush (more talk about bears)
13:52 this is so fresh you wouldn't smell it, usually ifyou're working around and you smell something ripe you need to be careful there's probably a kill site around. But that's pretty fresh, 1 doubt ifit's too smelly over there right now.
14:29 why don't we traverse into that pass, into that valley over there ... anywhere but that direction. E-l wonder how long he'll feed on that. J-We should check on it tonight, see ifhe's still there.
15 :23 ambi from that spot
16:41 good wind (ambi from bear viewing spot) 17:00
17:10 solo walking 17:55
18:03 CARIBOU -1 sigh, 1 don't need binoculars they're so close. (wind)
19:25 E-What spooked 'em?
19:42 they're coming toward us look at that, don't move, come right toward us
20: 18 they're coming right toward us, look how close, laugh (yes)
20:55 it's like they can't figure out what we are (good wind) ..(write the wind into this, we are downwind of them, they can't smell us)
21 :51 do they normally get that close, are they just curious? Yeah, did you notice they were trying to smell us, I've had them when they get downwind they
go oh, you're not a caribou. E-Maybe we're not very smelly. Woman-we'll see what happens in three days ...
23:09 I doubt ifthey've seen many humans (dave)
23:52 nunamiute put up stone figurines to herd them.. when a big migration came through that would help funnel them into an area..they'd think they were humans or predators and they would funnel them down and into the lakes...
26:04 Ambi-Hiking up to a bench to get a better look
27:20 hiking all of us (no talking) good sound. (can cut him out) 28:20 (migrate south, circling around grazing end up out of mountains inwoodland area south of brooks range by October).
29:34 good standing and quiet into moving again.
30:39 what caribou eat..what is this, lichen. How do they survive on this .. (starting studies on pops)
35:13 good climbing noise that recedes ..good one to use for transition ..moving up and away ...35:30 (nice and short and into wind) spaced omnis
36:37 walking over rocks (bill) falling? Loose 37:10
38:20 looking at caribou again crossing river
40:38 we get requests from people who travel through here occiasionally they want to name all the official naming there's an office in washington dc that acutally approves but in' wilderness and especically in this is to not add new names. So they'll listen to the peititon and consult with us and typically we ..this lake here really doesn't have a name..we could name this lake out in front ofus right now ..bat wing. But you know for the recrational user it's kind ofnice to, very few people have ever been, maybe nobody stood here it's kind ofneat to discover and explore it and get that feeling like you're the first ones here very well could be.
42:50 *************** YES YES YES
47:13 ambi for previous (nice by 49:08 there is a little sound ofwater as well)
50:12 spaced omnis (going to look at map)
50:49 can you show us where we are..great map sound...Gates of the Arctic, somehwere in this 8.S million acre wilderness, here's the lake we started at, let's put these together. good map sound there's that lake, so we're right here, and right
here it says continental divide .. right through that little knoll ..wait a minute, isn't this flowing ..(unamed) the valley...(figuring out where they are)
53:44 Barrow would be northwest of here 300 miles, if you floated down .. (no)
54:53 so we're in the central brooks range, about as far from development you can get even in alaska. ************
55:30 I always thought if you kept going, the western migration that americans have done ended up in Kotzebue, I thought if you kept going ..that it would continue to get as wild. I had to back up a little bit and maybe this is the place.
56:40 it still is the homeland for the nunimute people its an inhabitated wilderness, which is a new approach, acknowledge and recognize the indigenous people ..
58:54 how do you manage a place like this? Well I look at management as preserving much more than just land but our country's heritage, culutral concept..our people our country has decided its important to preserve places like this for future generations and the heritage part ofit is certainly part of the whole western movement ofpeople (0 thismight be what the great plains were ... and the land never supported that many people ..
1 :00: 16 it's really you know management is the wrong word it's really understanding and trying to educate ourselves about what's already here and how do we limit ourselves and control ourseleves to allow this natural force to continue, that;s reallyour job just TO LET NATURE BE NATURE HERE.****
focus reverses say
1:02:46 I think the biggest thing we're trying to do is understand this place .. identify what are the key ecological indicators to monitor in the long term that tell us whether or not we're doing our job,
1:05:35 so where should we go, I don't care, let's bag a peak, pick one we can name it after you, we can name any ofthese..
1:12:10 ambi (for previous interview)
1: 17:23 I'll tell you what. You guys all face that way, and I'll just point and I'll be turning around and somebody tells me where to stop, spin the park superintendent.. stop. Oh we've got to bag that peak ....
(seque into we hiked all day and never really went anywhere)
white alaska cotton, tiny purple harebells and brilliant orange and white lichen red and yellow leaves of low bush cranberries and blue berries.
1:20:10 ambi with wind
1 :20:52 good wind (really nice at 1 :21 :22) spaced omnis
1 :21 :42 walking (just bill)

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