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David Breashears  

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Commentary; Ice climbing  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
10 Feb 2000

    Geography
  • United States
    New Hampshire
    Locality
  • Mount Washington; Pinkham Notch Trail
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 44.2576   -71.2537
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Spaced Omni Stereo; DPA 4060 Omnidirectional Microphones

NPRINGS RADIO EXPEDITIONS
Log of DAT #: A-I
Reporter: Alex Chadwick Engineer: Flawn Williams Date: February 10,2000

ng = not good
ok= okay
g = good
vg = very good

DAVID BREASHEARS' (DB) HELMET MIC-FIRST PART OF HIKE/CLIMB

01:08 AC: will you be together when you change a pitch?

DB: yes, we will be changing gear, that will be natural dialogue. That he will be looking up, we'll be talking about the pitch, I'll say, rick yiou know we're 300 feet up, its 10:30, whatever ...

AC: do you keep track oftime?

DB: sure we do. We don't keep track of how long a pitch takes. Climbers are naturally look at their watches ...

RICK WILCOX (RW): to see how it's goin. If you're not moving fast enough, you gotta come down. That's probably one of the biggest mistakes climbers make, they just keep goin and goin, they ignore 2 things: ifthey"e moving slowly they"e probably not in good shape and they"e probably not physically fit .... there may be an environmental problem, it's really nasty and they're not making very good progress, but somewhere around 2:00, we say it's our turnaround time. Ifwe really don't have the summit in sight then it's time to tum around and head down. And that gives you 2 or 3 hours now of daylight to get below the trees at least and out of the bad weather before dark comes. We have a saying in the rescue business, any hour of daylight is worht 4 hrs of darkness, you can do a lot when, in the light. As soon as it gets dark you better know where you are you better know where you're going. It's real easy to get screwed up at night.

DB: inexperienced climbers especially get very demoralized in the dark and their instinct isnt ot somehow keep moving and get donw. I have this headlamp ... every time I put it in there I say why am I bringing this headlamp, and the way things work in life in this world, is the day I don't take this headlamp is the day rick or myself sprain an ankle, and we're really not in a bad way, but we're stuck on the mountain in the dark without a headlamp. So it's a habit, and sometimes I feel like a fool for putting in this pound of gear into my pack, but a light is a very important thing to have a t night when you don't know where you're going.

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