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Bob Moseley  

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NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
20 Oct 2000

    Geography
  • China
    Yunnan
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 28.4025   98.8111111
    Recording TimeCode
  • 46:51 - 49:00
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
    Accessories
    Equipment Note

NPR/NGS
RADIO EXPEDITIONS
Show: YGRP
Log of DAT #: 14
Engineer: Bill McQuay
Date: 10/22-10/23/00

ng = not good
ok = okay
g = good
vg = very good

0:16:35 T to C to English...meaning is the place for sang sa...I didn't get that, what is the place for? The place is called Lochiti, the meaning is put on fire and...Anyone special you pray to? Who do you pray to? C & T...

0:19:34 What's all that about? It means here...the time for pray is in the special days. The fifth...Every month the fifth, tenth, fifteenth, twenties, twenty-fives, and also in the new year festival. But here just for individual people to come here and pray. And there's another place for the whole village to build a fire and pray.

0:20:13 Are there certain kinds of branches, certain kinds of trees that he uses to burn? Translation...use two kinds of trees to put on fire. The first is pine, second is...Spruce...spruce...yu-sa...yeah, two two kinds of trees they use. And when burn the fire, they must put on five...seed...crops on it. The five crops are rice, wheat, barley maybe, corn...Consultation in Chinese...here, just use four kinds of crops, but in other villages, use 5...The rice and corn and wheat and ching-ko pi, black wheat...water...

0:23:25 When praying call the names of the Gods, according to the directions. So the four directions - east, west, north south...What are their names? He first to be Kawagebo...

0:25:05 GJ - The meaning is, all the Gods divided into the four directions. And when he is praying, call God's name according to the highest and the lowest here just like this. The highest one is Kawagebo and Wujimpeima and Padamenswa and Miensimu.

Interview with Bob Moseley (0:30:55 - 0:34:05)
0:30:55 Do you have a good fix on where we are? How high are we this time? We're about 12,500 feet, 3,700 meters. About the same altitude as Yubong? A little higher than Yubong? Perhaps higher than the waterfall? Even higher than the waterfall. Is this the highest we've been so far? You've been. Describe this vista. We're in this summer cattle camp, ringed by these huge, what are they, cedar? Fir trees. This is the biggest swath of the range here that I've seen. Do you know what we've got here, in terms of the names of the mountains? They're kind of in-and-out of the clouds, so I'm trying to get oriented. Directly above us here is the highest summit in the range, Kawagebo peak, the sacred Tibetan mountain. On that side, down to the south is the uncle of Kawagebo, who's name I forget, and then one of his soldiers sits over here, also in the clouds. Both of those are well above 20,000 feet. Kawagebo is above 22,000 feet. It's the one with the remarkable pyramid shape.

0:32:33 Is there a name for the mountain we're on? There is, the Tibetans have a name, I didn't catch it. Guo Jing and ??? are over there getting the data on that.

0:32:49 So how does this compare to the Rockies or the Andes? Well, it certainly approaches the Andes in terms of elevation, but it's another order of relief from the Rockies. If we stepped over here, we could look down and see the Mekong river at 6 thousand feet, then look up to these ridges which climb over 16000 feet to the summit.

0:33:30 As we came up, our guide showed us several sacred sites, so this isn't just an ordinary mountain. Actually, we stopped at one of the sacred sites where they all pray before they come up here, and then we stopped at a site called the seven Sisters which are seven small hills on the side of this mountain here. And then each of the camps also had names, and the small meadows that they use for location.

0:34:30 ambi

Interview with Bob Moseley (0:40:48 - 0:45:03)
0:40:48 Tell me again about the ridges and how they're protected in the project plan. In the United States we always think of alpine terrain, alpine zone as pretty well protected, not a lot of use. But here in the Great Rivers Project here in northwest Yunnan, the botanists and ecologists we're working with, one of them included it as a conservation target, ecosystem conservation targets, as we design this system of reserves in northwest Yunnan. And they are really heavily used. All of those ridges over there, those broad meadows¿right ahead of us about 2 or 3 kilometers¿It's really more like 20 kilometers across the Mekong in the Yeungling mountains. You can see those big, broad ridges coming of the Pi peaks and it's kind of a mosaic of low rhododendron scrub and herbaceous meadow vegetation and that grades up into the scree, the loose rocky terrain up above. And all that mosaic of natural communities is one of the three ecosystem conservation targets we used to design the system of reserves. They are heavily grazed by villagers' with yaks and some sheep. And the scree even, that looks totally barren from here actually has some very important medicinal herbs, they call it snow lotus. What kind of plant is that? It's in the Astor family, and it's heavily collected. You see big piles of it in the villages and towns around here in August, drying out. Extremely low productivity, but heavily collected in some areas. So the botanists were quite concerned and wanted it to be included in conservation targets.

0:43:00 What is the herb used for? To treat what? I think it's been explained to me as, a woman's problem. I'm not sure what that means. And you say "low productivity," does that mean there's just not a lot of it around? It means once you collect something, it takes a very long time for it to grow back. Those are elevations above 42, 4500 meters, so well above 14000 feet on up to 5000 meters, so 15000 feet. Obviously, very cold, not much grows and not much grows very fast up there.

0:43:50 And what does it look like? It's a low-growing, very hairy rosette, round mound of a plant. With lots of long hairs. It's collected right below the soil surface in the rocks. It may or may not get the roots. In some cases it looks like they don't, but¿ It's in the genus saseria. Again, like many we've talked about, this is the center of diversity for that particular genus. There's more here in these mountains than there is anywhere else in the world. I think there's only a half dozen in all of North America, and there's 40 or 50 here in this part of Yunnan, so there's lots of local species that are very rare. And when you go into the medicinal herb markets in the villages you can see, you can pick out different species that are hanging on the wall. They all treat it as one, when they're selling it, but you can definitely pick out a couple of different species.

0:45:03 ambi

1:06:53 (g) GJ: Especially on the New Year festival on the 15th and 25, the whole village, the old men put on new dresses and ride horses, come here to pray to the God¿the most important day is the 15th of March, a lot of people come here to pray, the whole day¿Just the men come here. When the men come back to the village, all of the women come out to welcome them.

1:08:05 The womens, March 15th, when the womens¿

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