ML 147621

AudioDateDownLeftRightUpCloseReportGallerySettingsGiftLanguageGridListMapMenuPhotoPlayPlusSearchStarUserVideo

Interview :03 - 8:33 Play :03 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Deborah Tabart  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Australia; Deborah Tabart  

Scaly-breasted Lorikeet -- Trichoglossus chlorolepidotus 8:33 - 15:31 Play 8:33 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
 

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Captive animal  

Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo -- Calyptorhynchus banksii 18:28 - 20:25 Play 18:28 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
 

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Captive animal  

Interview 20:40 - 58:10 Play 20:40 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Deborah Tabart  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Australia; Deborah Tabart  

Koala -- Phascolarctos cinereus 1:08:15 - 1:22:21 Play 1:08:15 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
 

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Captive animal  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
11 Mar 2000

    Geography
  • Australia
    Queensland
    Locality
  • Brisbane; Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
    Latitude/Longitude
  • -27.53293   152.9693
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
  • Sennheiser MKH 40
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS stereo

LNS#147621

Show: Australia
Log of DAT #B-1
Engineer: Manoli
Date: March 11,2000

ng =not good ok =okay g =good vg =very good

M/S with friends the Senrheiser at Lone Pine sancuaries

:08-DT What's happened in most habitats here in Brisbane, it's becoming more exotic.
Even if this was an existing habitat it wouldn't be able to handle native species.

:47-CJ-We're at Lone Pine Koala sanctuary, and this is one of the oldest sanctuaries in
Australia. It's got the largest number of animals in captivity. It's about 157 animals.

1:09-DT My name's Deborah Tabart, and I'm executive director of the Australian Koala foundation.

1:17-DT What you can hear in the background is scaley breasted laurakeets. They're just a beautiful little green and yellow parrot. (pauses here for ambience)

2:20-It's a bouchi bird, native species, black and white. Absolutely magnificent song, and urn, this afternoon you might be able to record it singing. (pause again for ambience)

2:45-Music starts in the background? Passing by musicians?

3:48-DT And we're coming up to my all time favorite, the flying foxes. We've got red flying foxes and black ones, and as you can see, they're hanging completely upside down and fast asleep. I think that they are one of the most amazing bats in the world. And if anyone thinks that bats are threatening, once you've met one of these they're the dearest little things. I actually even know one little flying fox that when you give him a piece of banana he'll turn his head around and eat it because he won't eat in front of you. (small child talking occasionally through this)

4:38-DT-Tells about flying fox society, number, bearing young upside down; several
thousand in group. Foxlike-face.

5:52-Actually the bats have the same skeletal frame as a human ... fingers just integrated ,into wingspan.

6:53-Ambi/FX of bat chatter

8 :41-some ambience of cockatoo chatter (low plane hum in background?)

10:16-Sealey Breasted Lorikeets Ambience. (toward the end, there is some talking)

13:33 -FX Loud honk of a bird.

15:30-Some chatter

16:03-Stop down

18:07-Bird says 'hello?'

18:33-Very loud honk straight into the mic.

18:36-Howls, sounds like a dog? Amid bird honks and other the loud bird call. (red
tailed cockatoo)

20:05-Audio skip. What we had heard was the red tailed cockatoo

20:35-Audio skip again.

20:42-DT Well, urn, Koalas in captivity can't really be compared to animals in the wild. Of all the animals that are in captivity sort of feel reasonably comfortable that koalas are, the happiest in a way because they sleep 20 hours a day and these animals would never survive in the wild. They're 3'd 4th generation captive. (onward) 21:24-In the wild you'd never see this many animals so close together. Sometimes in the wild you sometime have habitats about 200 acres. One animal will take control of, especially a large male. AS you can see there's probably about 15 koalas in here in a small cage.

21:50-DT I think when you see them sitting here like this they look like a teddy bear. Koalas in the wild are reasonably tough animals. Sharp claws and our researchers when they deal with them in the wild have got cuts and bruises to show for it. So what we're seeing here is a very domesticated animal that's used to having humans handle them, and as you can see they sleep all the time in the most amazing cute poses.

22:32-I don't know if you can hear all that scratching, but they're doing their grooming. That's their way of keeping all the little ticks and mites off their hair. Also what koalas do is, the eucalyptus oils, there's so many different species. They take a little bit of different leaves and blend an insecticide. In the wild they don't have tick bites and whatnot because of insecticide. In developed areas with only two or three trees and only one species they decline because they don't have the mixture.

25:24-Koala's claws are extremely sharp. Because they have to climb large trees. Sometimes it will be 200-300 feet that they have to climb in the wild. Have to have razor sharp claws to get to the top and to hang on.

26:59-saw in the paper that the four most recognizable icons in the world were the eiffel tower, statue of liberty, kangaroo and the koala. I was delighted. I've never met one person who doesn't love a koala. I think that to most Australians it represents what we're about. I think we just accept that koalas are part of us really. And that's in a way the reason it's so difficult to convey to people that we think they're in trouble. If you come somewhere like Lime Pine then you get the impression that things are all safe. But things
are not as good in the bush.

28 :00-I think this 'is an incredible animal for conservation in a way. They don't eat anyone, they don't hurt anyone they don't destroy any crops, they just sit in their tree and look delicious. If you can't conserve for this habitat, then we've got a
(problem with other species.

29:26-DT this is a bush thick knee. At nighttime they sound like a banshee, like a ghost in the bush. Very stealthy, wander through-the bush looking carefully at everything.

30:15-New Audio. Soft chatter.

34:57-New Audio. Child talks a bit in the background.

37:23-New locat10n, announcement about short talk-about1:he koalas.

38:45-Mumbling, chatter and looking for koalas. Has a presentation, echo-ey voice, lots of background noises.

41:34-Stops recording and instead goes to a scraping noise? Encouragement, laughter,
continued scraping against something. Finished recording in the 15ackground?

42:55-Scraping finally stops ... for a few seconds before beginning again.

43:35-New location

44:15-gutteral grunts amid talking. Chat fills in the background.

45:34-grunting sound before impressions about koalas.
45:37-Kid: I think they're cute, and, they're a great icon for Australia, and I love them! CJ-Does every school kid in Australia think that they're just tops? Kid: Yes, most of them
46:28-New location.

47:47-Sniffing noises, very soft. Goes into quiet ambience.

48:55-this is in Lime Pine open enclosure for kangaroos an there's a large number of kangaroos and wallabys in here. And this is a large kangaroo male. And he's grooming his fingers, look at the size of his claws.

49:32-He can actually stand up on his hind legs and his tail and then fight with another
male. There he goes.. .and now he's kissing that girl by the look of it

50:29-There is a lot of concern because they're culled and I've seen footage that I think is wrong. I have no doubt that we're not managing the population as well as we could. But I also know that out in the bush because there's increased water supply that we actually have large numbers of kangaroos. I have so little faith in human kind in its ability to manage any animal. (onward)

51:41-I think it's the same for the koalas. We tend to think everything will be okay, Australians think we live in a land of plenty, so we've got plenty of everything. But we are running out. We clear land at the rate second only to Amazonia, in fact US government was considering listing koala as endangered species, and I want that to happen.

53:17-We Australians constantly want to exploit our wildlife for tourism. 1.1 billion comes into Australia from economics from koalas. You imagine the millions of dollars made off kangaroos, stuffed koalas, etc. We did an assessment, $1.1 billion dollars, $2-5-biltion-in-this-Olympic year. And 9,000 tourist-jobs that-comes from just the koala.

58:15-New location, sound of closing doors, slight echo like auditorium.

59:01-New location again. Water sound splashing. Preparing the room. Then dropping into ambience of outside.

1:04:35-Honk of some animal?

1:05: 18¿ Still M/S, trying to get Koala bellow/grunt whatevah. Preparing for the opportunity.

1:07:15-Quiet Ambience, someone pushing through the bushes.

1:07:29-Koala calls?

1:08:15-Grunts. Almost guttural, burping noise. Noise of moving through the bushes compliments this.

1:12:28-An almost mewing sound.

1:13: 13-Loud crash of branches. (dunno what happened)

1:13 :29-Very aggressive grunting/burping noise.

1:16:29-Stops, new audio. Chatter among the group.

1:16:56-Gutteral grunting. Guy or koala? Responded to shortly after with obtuse sounding grunts.

Close Title