ML 147609

AudioDateDownLeftRightUpCloseReportGallerySettingsGiftLanguageGridListMapMenuPhotoPlayPlusSearchStarUserVideo

Environmental Recording :05 - 9:08 Play :05 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Laboratory ambi  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Interview 9:09 - 19:23 Play 9:09 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Beth Silkas  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Po'ouli  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
Mar 1998

    Geography
  • United States
    District of Columbia
    Locality
  • Smithsonian National Zoological Park
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 38.93108   -77.04973
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
  • Sennheiser MKH 40
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS stereo; Split track

Beth Slikas Log
Hawaii Birds
DAT #10

0204 - start & run first centrifuge, a little whirr up at top, mostly steady, to shut off, whirr down at 3:07 .... out by 3:15, with room ambi rumble continuing in back.

0359 - other centrifuge start up, better, louder whirring. To shut down at 05:00...... out at 5:15 ....

0535 - general lab ambi roll... background compressor out at 0550. Some light chat in back .... 0810 - compressor back on (hum) .... Out at 0900.

0921 - my name is Beth Slikas, I'm a post-doc. fellow here at the national zoo in Washington, D.C. I'm working on Hawaiian birds, with Robert Fleischer, who's the director of the lab.

1030 - the work came to our lab because we've been using a technique to sex the birds genetically here in the lab. and also i have a fair amount of experience in extracting DNA from feathers, and the material we got from the po'ouli was feathers. 1049

1056 - the technique is the same for any other tissue or blood. The problem is that the amount of DNA in a feather tends to be much less than in tissue. so the procedures are not any more difficult, but often takes longer to get results.

1123 - because the amount of DNA we get is very little, we have two problems. one is seeing the DNA, and the second problem is the risk of contamination, because we do a considerable amount of DNA work in the lab, we have lots of sort of random DNA floating around. and because the amount of DNA we can get from a feather is so little, the risk of contamination is much higher than for something we get from blood or tissue.

1205 - these feathers were also sent to a lab in England, which identified two of the birds as female. and previously, all 3 thought to be males, so the news that two of them could possibly be females is very good. the scenario in which two female and one male ideal when only have 3 individuals.

12:42 one of the birds i seem to have a conflicting result, maybe male, and previously identified by other lab as female. don't yet trust my result, amount of DNA from a feather is small. and when i look at the results, it's very faint. so I'm not positive. the other female? i believe so, not sure.

1931 - office room tone (interview site) 2046.

Close Title