ML 147604

AudioDateDownLeftRightUpCloseReportGallerySettingsGiftLanguageGridListMapMenuPhotoPlayPlusSearchStarUserVideo

Akohekohe -- Palmeria dolei :51 - 1:17 Play :51 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
 

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Akohekohe -- Palmeria dolei 1:29 - 5:17 Play 1:29 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
 

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Environmental Recording 5:18 - 10:32 Play 5:18 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Birds ambi  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Interview 15:14 - 39:12 Play 15:14 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Jack Jeffrey  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Po'ouli; Hawaii endangered birds  

Interview 15:14 - 39:12 Play 15:14 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Betsy Harrison Gagné  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Po'ouli; Hawaii endangered birds  

Environmental Recording 39:12 - 52:28 Play 39:12 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Birds ambi  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

 

Interview 59:33 - 1:05:58 Play 59:33 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Jack Jeffrey  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Po'ouli; Hawaii endangered birds  

Interview 59:33 - 1:05:58 Play 59:33 - More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
Betsy Harrison Gagné  

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

100%

 

 

 

Po'ouli; Hawaii endangered birds  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
11 Mar 1998

    Geography
  • United States
    Hawaii
    Maui County
    Locality
  • Haleakala volcano
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 20.70972   -156.25333
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
  • Sennheiser MKH 40
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS stereo

NPR/NGS RADIO EXPEDITIONS
HAWAII - Birds - Search for the Po'ouli
DAT #5

01:38 - 05:00 Betsy calling in birds + Ambience - some distinct calls [OK]

[helicopters in the ambience]

11:00 - 14:30 Ambience and wind -birds not too chatty or present [NVG]

Interview with Jack and Betsy:
16:18 -

Q. Range of endangered birds

JJ: The range of the endangered birds, specifically the parrot bill and the crested honeycreeper is a very narrow band on the east slope of Haleakala.. . .between 5,000 to 7,000 feet, maybe 12 miles long, 1-1/2 mile wide. [16:43] The range of the po'ouli within that habitat is probably estimated about 2 square miles. That's the only place on earth where po'ouli exist. [17:12]
That's a real party stopper.

BG: That's usually what happens, if you ask any of us about its range or its number, people will say it occupies a postage size area or that it is nearly gone, and then what else can you say, pretty devastating.. . . . . . . .the polyanna in me is still not ready to write them off, and I think that until we have done the most we possibly can to secure the habitat as a whole, if by some awful circumstances we lose po'ouli, we will not lose all the other birds in the bargain. Key is management of the habitat - whether that is predator control, keeping the fences out to keep pigs from devastating the vegetation, whatever it takes.

Q. Rats?

BG: Rats are the biggest predator of all. So pigs may prey on the vegetation directly, but the rats prey on the plants, insects, land snails.. . ..prey on the birds, hatchlings and eggs, devastating impact on the birds. The question become how you go about having a successful rat control program in a fragile area - rainforest like this, and that is one of the issues we are wrestling with at the moment. [19:40]

Q. yesterday po'ouli captured. What happens next.

BG; [1948] It was captured and banded and they removed feathers from it. Will go off for DNA testing, they are able to extract the DNA and determine the sex of the bird. Right now the other two birds are female, so we are anxiously awaiting news of whether we have another female, or we possibly have a male. Then there will be a question, do we get these birds together for an in forest date, or what do we do.
Maybe this Maui creeper coming in can offer us some advice. 20:46 + [bird FX - faint]

BG: 20:50 I think until we do what New Zealand has done and other countries to really get the public aware what this rainforest means, why it's important to preserve and protect, and once people understand the importance of launching a predator control program, we'll have the understanding and support. We know the area is special and wonderful. Most people don't know it even exists, can't relate to it. [21:28]

JJ: The public doesn't get up here. The public and that's part of the problem. It's protected because it's isolated and difficult to. If public could get close to it, could see 'I 'iwi , would be proud of that particular bird is part of the island life. Public education should be number 1 for all of us.. . . . .

Q. Management plan?

BG: [22:36] We have a management plan that's been written. A number of agencies got together, are a number of priorities. This is the time of year when po'ouli are most active, most vocal, which is why are doing the extraterritorial search. And then, to look at other priorities, building up education/outreach program, predator control, possible removal of eggs, parrot bills and crested honeycreeper, all this written into the plan with the view of maintaining the habitat as it is - road to recovery. [to maintain and enhance and not bring something back from the brink. First time that there has been a really good and successful meetings of the minds, many personalities, different agencies, with different. guiding principles, difficult
to arrive at a consensus of how move forward.. . .challenge. Has helped to have an onsite management team. The project manager is here on Maui - team is dedicated to work in Maui rainforest.. . . . .are emphasizing Hanavi but not at the expense of and ignoring all the other rainforests. This just happens to have one of the highest densities of rare and endangered birds anywhere.

JJ: [Goes on to explain dynamics of multi-agency team doing this work [25:54]
Many different agencies working together for the preservation of the ecosystem. And it is. [26:21] The po'ouli is only one part of this situation. We're here today for the po'ouli, but the whole idea is to preserve the ecosystem and all the birds that are in it, not just the po'ouli. The po'ouli happens to be the key that has brought us here, but the overall scheme is the ecosystem approach. [26:46] Once it's gone like so many other birds, gone, gone forever.

Q: Decline of forest birds.

JJ: [27:30] Decline of forest birds is related to a number of limiting factors. Habitat lost, predation, disease, and competition from introduced birds and animals. The continuing decline.. .this isn't something new to Hawaii, has been going on for over 100 years, a good example of decline, no forest birds in lower elevations.. . .below 4,500 feet, rarely see forest birds.. . . . .impact birds at higher elevations.
Introduced diseases, malaria and pox, which are enhanced by pigs. Diseases passed by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes become acclimated to higher elevations, take with them a wave of death The forest only goes up to 7,000 feet. Continues to move up in elevation, while birds devastated by other things. Right here where we are sitting, populations were a lot greater than now. Right here, the birds, although not affected by disease, are affected by habitat loss, because of pigs, predation from rats, and competition from exotic birds that have been introduced.

Q. Can look backward in time, can you look forward - if rates of extinction continue.

JJ: [30:00] I am optimistically pessimistic. With the right management, we have the tools now to manage the se areas, my personal feeling many of these birds are going to make it.. . . ..examples. Po'ouli very iffy one. What we find out in the next two weeks may determine whether that bird is going to go into extinction or not. [30:44] Also looking at other islands.. . . . . [more til 31:452]

Q. Describe where we are.

JJ: jokes that " Notice as we sit here in our hammocks sitting under the palm trees with fruity drinks in our hands . ... laughs

BG: [32: 101 We're sitting on a slope between 10 and 30 degrees. This is an unusually sunny day, almost borders on hot for upper Hana - with a tall canopy that is scattered and open.. . .scarlet red flowers.. . ..winter Hawaiian style - get in sunshine, Hawaiian summer.. . . . .Most people when think coming - sunny beaches, whales jumping, usually far from warm Usually freeze our buts off.. .when up here before - didn't stop raining.. . ..now haven't had appreciable rain for last 2 months.. ... can have impact too. Affect rat movements and predation.. . ..turn to birds more than plants. Enjoyable day to sit and bird watch - and not slosh in rain.. . .also concern if dry period continues.. . ..one of the longest dry spells. [34:40]

JJ: 34:48 Here we are sitting in this green verdant forest with the fern covered ground.. . ..brilliant scarlet 'I'iwi, ¿Apapane, flitting through the trees, green creepers singing and calling, amazing place.. . .500 year old trees, canopy 60-70 feet above our heads, an amazing place to be.

BG: . . . .goes on to talk about plants.. . ..trying to get message across.. consider it a personal privilege.. . .to be up here. Volunteers here to do this work.. . .recognize how important area is.. . .. I'd rather be condemned for trying than not.

[End sit down interview with Jack and Betsy] [39: 17]

39: 18 - 40: 18 Nice quiet Ambience - from scene - many flies - some birds [then helicopter]

42: 15-42:50 same Ambi continued

43:05 - Ambience with more present birds [VG] for under copy - then gets windy at 44: 13.. .
[blows leaves and trees - good if want wind in the trees ambi]
[good fly landing on mic at 45:28] then very clean quiet ambi - no planes and only gentle winds. [52:33]

52:46 Betsy and jack telling us what we were hearing in the last recording.

JJ: If you listen quietly can hear ¿Apapane in the canopy - BG - more IDS.. . . . . [53 :45] NVG

59:39 JJ: The ¿Apapane is a common Hawaiian honey creepers. Maroon red color with short black down-curved bill. One of most common honeycreepers through all of the islands.. . ..the 'I'iwi is another honeycreeper.. . . .describes. Crested honeycreeper.. . . .

then Betsy describes more - Maui creeper.. . . . .more to End [1:06:06]

Close Title