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Interview 7:10 - 28:24 Play 7:10 - More
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Jonathan Green  

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Flightless Cormorant  

Flightless Cormorant -- Phalacrocorax harrisi 10:20 - 25:20 Play 10:20 - More
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1 Adult  

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Interview 29:55 - 36:00 Play 29:55 - More
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Rob Dunbar, Jonathan Green  

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Fernandina Island description  

Sound Effects 36:07 - 36:36 Play 36:07 - More
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Lava bed  

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Environmental Recording 40:50 - 43:41 Play 40:50 - More
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Gentle ocean surf  

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Environmental Recording 43:41 - 45:00 Play 43:41 - More
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Walking on sand beach  

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NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
6 Jun 1998

    Geography
  • Ecuador
    Galápagos
    Locality
  • Galapagos Islands; Fernandina Island; Punta Espinoza
    Latitude/Longitude
  • -0.26583   -91.44694
    Habitats
  • Marine Shoreline
    Features
  • Island
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
  • SONY TCD-D7
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
  • Sennheiser MKH 40
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS stereo; Sennheiser MKH40 Cardioid Mid Mic and MKH30 Bidirectional Side Mic through Sonosax Preamp into Sony TCD7

NPR/NGS RADIO EXPEDITIONS - GALAPAGOS LOGS

NPR/NGS- RE - Galapagos
Dat #5 page 1

00:00 - 02:00 Slate Ambi - at arrival point on - near injured seal - Espinosa ****

04:13 - 7:10 [at 05:00 FX - Seal exhale] + Ambi on trail

07:11 - 9:29
Jonathan Green: JG: Now, this is interesting, look at this. This is a nesting site of the flightless cormorants¿.. And they¿re not particularly choosey in the material they use for nesting. But I¿ve never seen them using pencil pined sea urchins like this¿.20 sea urchins to build up the nesting area, and by the looks of it, they¿ve already abandoned. At this time the courtship, one of the pair would usually be here on the nesting site, so if there¿s no one here, that would indicate started courtship, went into nesting and then gave up, not enough food around. Back in `82, ¿83, they reported cormorants actually using dead marine iguana as nesting material, the carcasses were so abundant, they just piled them up around them.. Here we¿ve got a separate different approach.

AC: Dead iguana right there¿..
JG: Seems going same way as 82 and 83¿..just going through the motions, then giving up/
AC: And how many would be nesting here
JG: Varies from year to year¿sometimes 3-4 nests right here¿.these are populations that travel a lot - some years many nests, other years none. [9:30] then wind

AC: Come over to another part of land, don¿t see so many iguana¿

AC:[10:12] *** What¿s this coming up here?
JG: That¿s a flightless cormorant coming up with nesting material. See where he or she goes¿..FX
of cormorants¿..[condense all this into a scene with description by Alex. Note use FX of cormorants that follow].
JG: What we saw right now is the bringing of nesting material onto land is usually what a pair would do so for one bird to do it on its own ¿.would be interesting to see if this a male continuing to try to nest - female has abandoned ++ FX - Cormorants.
***FX: 11:46 - 12:09 Cormorants - [ plus Alex¿s notes at 12:09]
AC: 12:09 ** This bird that¿s come waddling up out of the water and across the lava rock holding a leaf that it¿s deposited in a little nesting area. It¿s like a duck, only a little larger but it `s got that kind of shape and feathers. The bill is ..a little longer, and it¿s got a little hook at the end, and what¿s really different about this bird is its wings which are stubby little kinds of things¿.no good for flight, in fact, this bird doesn¿t fly anymore. [12:39]
JG: There are some 20 or so species of cormorants in the world, and this is the only flightless cormorant.
It¿s endemic to Galapagos, it¿s a unique species we have here.
AC: **I¿m struck again by the fact that I don¿t anywhere else in the world you could go where a bird like that, a wild animal would just come straight up and seemingly not be very bothered by our standing 10 feet away from its nesting site.
JG: Yeah¿.seem to be unaware of our presence. Also, realize it¿s flightless. That¿s an indicator that
no land predators, no cats or dogs naturally in Galapagos¿problems with introduced species. That¿s the reason have lost their ability to fly - no have to flee from any big predator. Anything on land is harmless.
[13:48] See that wing drying behavior. ¿typical¿
14:10 - 15:50 Ambi [not great] [ok for under copy] very quiet cormorants [ 15:13 - FX louder call]
16:00 - 17:00 Ambi more re. Sea/wave ambi - with slight cormorant fx

17:36 JG: ¿courtship¿.snake dance when start to intertwine their necks¿.
More explanation re. mating dance down by water [ok,but not great]

****19:06 - 19:15 FX Cormorants [VG]
NPR/NGS - RE - Galapagos
DAT #5 - p. 2

***19:40 - 22:40 Ambi Waves[VG] watch mic handling [listen through to best couple minutes]

*****22:53 - 23:10 FX - Cormorants - [VG]
Use whole sequence of 22:55 - 24:04 - Cormorants with Alex + JG

AC: [whispering] Several minutes have gone by and this male cormorant has come across the lava to join the female here

24:04 - 26:50 Ambi - long bed from scene with cormorants
Jonathan - more re. mating to 28:29

29:55 AC: Rob, can you describe the area here?
RD: This is all a large lava flow, but we¿re actually standing on an interesting part of it. This is an area where very hot lava was moving very quickly, and the surface cooled a little, and as it cooled, the rock formed in these ropey filaments that you can see around us, and the ropey filaments were dragged along by the current and clumped together in these smooth bundles here, and this is a special kind of lava that the Hawaiians call¿.[sp], very different kind of rock formation¿.rough, sharp formal, lava freezes solid¿.cal ¿ah, ah¿. Test this on Jonathan. I¿m very impressed that Jonathan is here in his bare feet, in midday sun, here at the equator. This is a dry part of the islands. This lava flow at least several centuries old¿..this spot here is probably clear by storm events¿..[32:28]

32:38AC: Jonathan, just in terms of looking at the land here, is there a difference re. El Nino?
JG: see some changes, you can see a few of succulent plants, these do not exist during dry years, so all of this will die out, already turning brown¿and some of the sedges [sp] growing out on the beaches, that would not be here during a dry year.
AC: Is that good for finches? Do you see anything here that is doing well because of the dry year?
JG: Well, the lavel [sp] is - preying on the flies on the dead carcasses of the marine iguana, so I think there¿s a big, big population of lavelices¿Finches don¿t see a great deal in this area. Better areas for feeding. You can see this area has been uplifted so another reason why we don¿t see a lot of vegetation is that some of this was originally below the high tide mark - below ocean¿.more re. mangroves¿.
RD: 34:29 I think that¿s a key feature of these coastal environments that when the big volcanoes erupt
it¿s very common to find large areas of the coastal shelves either dropping down or rising up out of the sea. Tomorrow when we go to Urvina Bay, we will see an entire community that was raised up out of the sea in March of 1954. Sits there as 8 kilometers of coral community that was thriving until this rapid eruption event¿..That eruption was the volcano Alcedo [sp]. ¿pools of lava¿.very dynamic landscape, especially along coast [36:03

***36:05 - 36:37 Ambi/FX - good crunching sound of walking on/moving lava.

Background chatting

39:00 Leo walking in sand, but talking in background¿.better at 40:30 as Leo gets set up to record ambi by the sea
*****41: 04 - 43:30 Ambi of sea/small light waves on the beach [VG]
**** 43:43 - 45:00 Ambi - Leo walking in sand by himself - no talking - then at ****45:02 - a bit of boat sound as the boat appraoches, plus change of ambi as Leo walks through small mangrove to boat landing
then get into boat [mic bump] and take off 46:30
46:48 JG: Amazing that Fernandina is the largest [island? Check ] land area in the Pacific with no introduced species - [that¿s why such concern when sea cucumber fishermen came here]

48:10 Ambi - motor boat underway then slowdown, then too much talking¿[NG]

****48:44 - 49:20 FX - boat docking at Samba - getting back on Samba. ¿OK¿
END

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