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Interview 11:57 - 17:40 Play 11:57 - More
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Boreal forest conservation  

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NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
8 Jun 2003

    Geography
  • Canada
    Alberta
    Locality
  • Calling Lake
    Latitude/Longitude
  • 55.18514   -113.35693
    Habitats
  • Forest
    Recording TimeCode
  • :47 - 19:55
    Geography
  • Canada
    Alberta
    Habitats
  • Forest
    Recording TimeCode
  • 22:55 - 26:32
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
  • HHB PORTADAT PDR 1000
    Microphones
  • Sennheiser MKH 50
  • Sennheiser MKH 30
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1; Decoded MS stereo; Sennheiser MKH50 Hypercardioid Mid Mic and MKH30 Bidirectional Side Mic

NPR/NGS
RADIO EXPEDITIONS
Show: Boreal Songbirds
Log of DAT #: 7
Engineer: Marcia Caldwell
Date: June 8, 2003

0:07
MC: It¿s in the morning, we just finished interviews. It¿s overcast. It¿s kind of rainy. We¿re gonna now do some ambience tracking of people walking about and again it¿s MS and it¿s MKH50 and MKH30 combination, MS and here we go.

0:29
MC: Just climbing in here so they can walk towards me. Is this good?

0:35
EA: Ready?

0:36
MC: Yeah, standby¿.hold on. Ok, go ahead please.

0:47
Ambi. Bird sounds. Rustling of leaves, branches, etc.

0:55
Ambi. Walking.

1:28
MC: Ok. Hold on.

1:31
MC: Now¿Don¿t go by so close because one of the branches went ¿whap¿ on the mike.

1:38
Ambi. Laughing

1:42
EA: This is like doing theatre here.

1:44
MC: Alright, so let me stand

1:46
Ambi. Mike sounds. Branches cracking.

1:50
MC: Ok, I¿m not going. Wait, don¿t go¿wait, wait, wait

1:53
Ambi. Mike sounds.

2:00
Ambi. Branches cracking. Walking.

2:25
Ambi. Forest sounds. Birds.

2:29
MC: Ok

2:31
EA: You like that?

2:32
MC: Yeah, that was good.

2:33
EA: You want to do yourself as you¿re walking out?

2:35
MC: Ok, let me try that.

2:40
MC: ¿going to do more of this ambient walking trail. Ambience.

2:48
Ambi. Forest sounds.

3:12
MC: Ok.

3:14
Ambi. Forest. Walking.

3:43
MC: Ok. Now we¿re going to try walking through the forest with¿

3:53
Ambi. Walking. Good birds in the background.

4:48
Ambi. Bird sounds.

4:58
Ambi. Walking.

6:30
Ambi. Quieter walking.

7:57
Ambi. Frogs and birds.

8:14
Ambi. Good bird sounds.

8:30
Ambi. Forest.

8:47
MC: So that was our trip to Calling Lake and now we¿re going to walk back up the hill.

9:00
Ambi. Some talking. Forest .

9:12
Ambi. Walking with some talking. Mike sounds.

9:37
MC: Do you want this on tape?

9:38
EA: No, not the planks. They¿re too hard to explain.

9:41
MC: Ok, but this trip, walking up. Do you want that on tape?

9:44
EA: Do you think we have enough sound of walking through the woods?

9:46
MC: Well, I think if we¿re here we might as well just do it so¿

9:50
EA: Yeah, from here. I was talking because¿We¿ll wait for you now.

9:57
Ambi. Walking.

11:22
EA: What is it?

11:23
Marilyn: Eastern Phoebe.

11:25
EA: Phoebe?

11:28
Ambi. Walking.

11:54
EA: You know, can we just stop for a minute? Marilyn?

11:57
Marilyn: Yes?

11:58
EA: A thought occurs to me. I¿m so sorry. Could we interview you? How do you feel about that?

12:08
M: I¿ll be perfectly honest with you. It¿d make my day of Boreal Songbird Initiative and my name was in the story somewhere, but I don¿t really feel like¿

12:17
EA: Talking about it? Because it¿s Canadian?

12:20
M: No¿we could try it.

12:24
EA: Well let¿s just try this. You know, the part that I think is hard for those guys to talk about is why Americans should care. Because it sounds preachy because they¿re Canadians, but maybe you could tell me why Americans should care. Why should we care? Why should someone in Ohio give a damn about what¿s going on up here? Or anywhere for that matter.

12:48
M: Well, I think a lot of people in the United States don¿t understand that there¿s this huge wilderness on our continent that has an amazing array of species, including billions of birds and I think what people also don¿t realize is that we use much of the resources in the Canadian Boreal. So, for example, the oil and gas that is developed in the Boreal, it actually, much of it gets used in the United States. Something like 60% of the wood that is cut in the Boreal gets¿I hate this.

13:33
EA: That¿s alright, that¿s alright, Gets exported¿ you¿re doing great. Don¿t don¿t don¿t blanch. So, we take take take take take and then maybe one day say, well, why aren¿t there more birds at my feeder? Right?

13:52
Yeah, um. I think what people also don¿t understand is that a lot of the birds that fly through the Unites States from Central America or South America, beautiful warblers, they actually breed in the Boreal Forest and the Boreal Forest has over a third of the birds that are in the United States and Canada are actually breeding in the Boreal, so many of the birds you might see at your feeder like a Dark-eyed Junco or a White-throated Sparrow, you should think about the great northern forest when you think about those birds.

14:29
EA: Even though they have American names like CT Warbler or TN Warbler¿

14:33
M: Cape May Warbler and¿

14:35
EA: Philadelphia Vireo, they¿re not intrinsically American birds?

14:40
M: What I understand is that they were seen at one point in those places and that¿s why they have those names, but in all of those cases, they were flying through to go up to the Boreal Forest to breed.

14:51
EA: So, that¿s¿they might fly through our back yard, but the critical place for them is right here where we¿re standing.

14:59
M: Yeah. This is their nesting grounds. This is their home. This is where the babies are born and fledged and we need to respect that and care about those birds.

15:12
EA: What do you like about it? What do you like about¿I mena, you¿re running around, you¿re totally excited, you¿re feeling really good. What is it about this place that you like? Honest for true.

15:28
M: I just think they¿re so few places left on the planet that are untouched and that are going to be here for future generations. This is a place where people can work together to actually make sure that development takes place. And protection is considered and large areas are protected for species that need those large areas. And, we¿ve just developed so much of our country and we have to figure out what¿s left and what can be protected because if we don¿t protect it, we¿re not protecting ourselves.

16:07
EA: So, it¿s an opportunity?

16:09
M: Yeah.

16:11
EA: You were great. No worries. It¿s ok. We¿ll continue our walk.

16:18
Ambi. Mike sounds. Talking.

16:34
EA: I have one last question for you. It¿s a really really tough one. What¿s your favorite bird here? One of your favorite birds here? I like the one that goes, bee beep, but you¿re more familiar with the actual birds than I am. What¿s your favorite bird of the Boreal? Or one of them? Come on, don¿t think about the importance of it. What one do you like?

17:07
M: I don¿t know.

17:08
EA: You don¿t know?

17:10
M: I love knowing there¿s all these birds. I don¿t really have a particular one that I like better than another.

17:18
EA: Why did you want to see the pelican?

17:20
M; Well, cause I just think it¿s so fascinating that pelicans breed in the Boreal Forest. You always think of the ocean when you think of pelicans, not the forest and it¿s pretty interesting that they are dependant on the water that¿s created in the Boreal Forest.

17:38
EA: Great.

17:40
Ambi. Walking. Birds. Talking. Mike sounds.

19:10
EA: Think we have enough?

19:11
MC: Yeah, I do

19:12
EA: Because you probably got some when you were just walking¿

19:18 ¿ change of scene
MC: Let me stand right here, ok?

19:21
Ambi. Lumber Mill.

19:33
Someone talks and is shushed

19:35
Ambi. Lumber Mill. Sawing sounds with bird sounds.

19:55
Ambi. Whispering.

20:06
Ambi. Lumber Mill.

20:11
Ambi. Car passes

20:25
Ambi. Lumber Mill with some birds.

21:28
Ambi. Car passes.

21:50
Ambi. Lumber Mill.

22:11
Ambi. Car passes. Mike sounds.

22:20
Ambi. Lumber mill.

22:27
MC: Stand right there, would you? About four feet away. That¿s good.

22:35
Ambi. Lumber Mill.

22:55
Ambi. Lumber Mill with loud bird sound.

23:05
Ambi. Lumber Mill with softer bird sounds.

23:35
Ambi. Lumber Mill. Some mike sounds.

23:50
Ambi. Lumber mill with some bird sounds.

24:00
Ambi. Lumber mill with good birds.

24:12
Ambi. Lumber Mill with some birds.

25:23
Ambi. Lumber Mill with loud bird.

25:40
Ambi. Lumber Mill.

26:33
MC: This has been the sound of the Mill from about 200 yards away in front of a large area where a lot of little birds are hanging out.

26:49
Sound ends.

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