ML 137902

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Interview :39 - 28:37 Play :39 - More
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Ted Parker  

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White-lored Tyrannulet -- Ornithion inerme 1:05 - 3:30 Play 1:05 - More
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Time of Day: 0740  

Blue-and-yellow Macaw -- Ara ararauna 1:17 - 2:10 Play 1:17 - More
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Time of Day: 0740  

Interview 28:37 - 1:24:18 Play 28:37 - More
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Robin Foster  

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Interview 1:24:18 - 1:37:16 Play 1:24:18 - More
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Al Gentry  

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Screaming Piha -- Lipaugus vociferans 1:49:20 - 1:55:23 Play 1:49:20 - More
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Time of Day: 0930  

Red-throated Caracara -- Ibycter americanus 1:56:55 - 2:00:00 Play 1:56:55 - More
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Time of Day: 0935  

NPR/NGS Radio Expeditions
5 Nov 1991 at 07:40

    Geography
  • Bolivia
    Santa Cruz
    Locality
  • Noel Kempff Mercado National Park; El Encanto camp
    Latitude/Longitude
  • -14.625   -60.69306
    Habitats
  • Rainforest
    Features
  • Roadside
    Channels
  • Stereo
    Sampling Rate
  • 48kHz
    Bit Depth
  • 16-bit
    Recorders
    Microphones
    Accessories
    Equipment Note
  • Stereo=1

LNS #137902 DAT #3 Morning walk with TP continue -Tuesday Nov. 5th -7:40 a.m. TP: continues to i.d. birds right above. Up to about 18 species in this tree right now. Flies. Canopy sounds (good) flies -short louder birds -TP off mike TP: (Note: some of this okay though not much sound --though Ted says there more than 100 birds in the tree) talks about concept of a mixed flock (on mike). Why birds flock -safety in numbers. (note: okay but not that interesting and very little bird sound. .more re. canopy flocks .pairs. ---butterfly ---The actual learning that these birds maintain and defend a flock territory I've just learned in the last 10 years. Most people thought birds were just wandering throughout the forest. Not true. Are about a dozen species of small -green flycatchers. TP cont.: Bard to see. if don't learn their songs impossible. Even with binoculars a bird at 150' that's 4" long -and green, but when actually out here in the forest -hard to see. People study books then come on trip -they just want to go home. I just do it by voice. I just listen. I spent hours when first starting out. Have to learn and identify them one by one. It's very important that you know what you're hearing and that voice goes with the bird. listening FX: truck comes by TP: When I'm with a group of people, have a place in mind, line up near a log, nothing happens, then a nightingale wren comes along have a tape with 40-50 species, great thing about a tape recorder is that you keep the birds there. people get pretty excited. vast majority of people who come to Amazonia just want to see. Most of the experience for me has just been auditory. I try to turn people onto all the sounds. Many areas where work, canopy is closed, see almost nothing. Unless you know the sounds a~ have a tape recorder would be very frustrated. So that's a big part of what I do. Truck picks everyone up.Talk with driver. Planning what will do the next day El Encanto camp: Truck door slams. Meet Robin.pressing plants for Al Gentry. describes new species he may have found near camp. (note: maybe use a bit of truck, plus door slam, plus intros to Robin just as a change of scene, though it's not too interesting. Robin Foster: Nothing is known about the flora here.making quick lists of everything we see. Making a quick map. Must have had a lot of mahogany in this valley.giants. Canopy here is one of the highest -50 meters. Must have been a magnificent forest. Flora is intact, but not the vegetation. talk of getting to waterfall. 150 meter drop AC: how does the work you are doing differ from Al Gentry? RF: There is overlap. He has more experience in different places. I'm trained as an ecologist. He is trained as a plant systematisist and biogeographer. I'm looking at the bigger scale picture and he's looking at intensive transects of a quarter of a hectare. every individual in that area. And I 'm trying to put this in larger context of a region. Focus on differences in forests.grasslands etc. I can say this forest is that it's not as diverse as central Amazon, but is surprisingly rich for being at southern end of Amazon Basin forest. I suppose it's because at basis of these cliffs, there's heat and humidity.lot of species that might have died out 10,000 years ago, still here. Would be more exciting if hadn't cut out mahogany. This will recover, the cutover area still has species there so overtime, 2-300 years will recover.. it's not lost. If they can protect it now, this will be a fantastic park. AC: what is the plateau? RF: describes. RF: Surprised to see so many species so far south. Here's this highly diverse forest right next to dry forest. ****** :46 (flies) Basically it is the basic Amazonia flora. It's juxtaposed with so many other communities, with chaco forest ...I think Bolivia is fantastic. It's just got every possible subtropical community.such a rich diversity of communities, not just communities, but different kinds of habitats. this stuff has been mostly wiped out in adjacent countries where it had been more abundant at one time. AC: trained as an ecologist as well as a botanist RF: explains.... (Log skips @ 7 minutes re. ecology work and study he does . scientific/conservation study discussion. 1:03: You can say that what we are doing is science, but RAP is sloppy science... loose science. What I have here is a chance to look at natural experiments that are going on. looking at experiments done by nature on a big scale and trying to gauge their results. you do have a gross similarity between this and experimental science. If it's all gone they won't have anything. If I can be right 75% of the time, it doesn't matter to me if it's good or bad science. Like all science, based on the ability and perception doing it, we can do sloppy science that will tell us a lot. Not denigrating good science. Good science takes a long time. Part of what disillusioned me about straight academic biology and ecology was going out and seeing journals full of studies based on one summer's work. If you spend time in places down here, there are changes. Studies based on one point in one year. when draw conclusions from just one period in time.bad. AC: why wouldn't that criticism apply to what RAP does? RF: The idea is that we can see things on a bigger scale....can't just follow in detail over 50 years. .These trees live 3-500 years. When you study the reproduction of these trees over several years, climate etc. and other changes, but if we do these intensive studies only, everything else will be gone. won't even have a chance to know what it was made up of. AC: personal of at camp **** AC: here comes Ted Parker with a small green friend AC and RF: more re. typical camp day (NO -but do describe the days in script) ***** (use this if have good bees to mix in and as intro to AC copy re. camp life) RF: On this trail I have never seen such an abundance of wasps. Louise goes around in shorts For me, if I'm collecting plants, try to get back early, to do pressing...This business of identifying things by their leaves is a talent that is restricted to very few people. Al Gentry and I do this. others hate this. For ourselves it's useful .we're doing something that is non-traditional. Nobody has been trained to do this. _ We're some of the few people in the world who can do this ... i.d. in transects. Our goal isn't just to do this community level stuff -set up plot and i.d. things in it.... AC: how often would you encounter something you hadn't seen before. RF: 1/3 of species here I hadn't seen before. 5% of the genera I know. With the species that I don't recognize, don't know if it's a new species or one that I haven't seen before.... Al knows virtually all the species. I can't do that. FX: of RF doing what he does .describes what life is like there. What I really miss is Chicago, I miss ballet, I miss NPR. One of the first things I do is flip on NPR and find out where the world's out. ***** FX: of Robin Foster at work (yes) putting plants in paper. (@ 3 minutes) (Walking tour of plants with Al Gentry on road near El Encanto.bee stings AG:(off mic. in the beginning, but this section is interesting -use a bit of it plus bee sting plus bees) one of things talking about how tell different plants apart when don't have flowers. talks about a particular plant (woody vine lianas) which has liquid that are harmful. When you find glands like that, (bee sting) is to attract ants, chase away insects that would otherwise eat the leaf. complex flower . .takes an intelligent organism. when ever you see that complex a flower, know it will be bees which are the most intelligent pollinator. (more intelligent than birds?) yes. (listen to this again for content and pick out additional sections -maybe part where are smelling pepper plant) bats disburse the fruits) Al gets AC to identify a plant. FX: smelling Al describes the old-growth forest. Here it's very disturbed. They've taken out much of the mahogony. Road here .heavily cut down just as Park being established. FX: truck arrives. Talking as 10k at monkeys out window. good door opening. TP in Spanish FX: ***** good door slam and truck start but then it cuts off. FX: ******* Screaming Piha bird -7 good calls, cicadas rise nicely in later calls ......Door slams again. Louise and Ted get out of truck to walk back along trail. Drive on. stop along the road to record Red-throated Caracaras.

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