ML 105886

AudioDateDownLeftRightUpCloseReportGallerySettingsGiftLanguageGridListMapMenuPhotoPlayPlusSearchStarUserVideo

Fox Sparrow -- Passerella iliaca More
Audio »
More
Video »
Browse
species »
 

Age/Sex
Identification
Solicitation
Behavior
Note

 

 

 

song

call

mimicry

 

 

Evening Grosbeak -- Coccothraustes vespertinus
MacGillivray's Warbler -- Geothlypis tolmiei
Mountain Quail -- Oreortyx pictus

Robert C Faucett
8 Jun 1993 at 00:00

    Geography
  • United States
    California
    Sierra County
    Locality
  • N of Yuba Pass, Bear-trap meadow, or Jones Valley
No locations found with lat/long
    Channels
  • Mono
    Sampling Rate
    Bit Depth
    Recorders
  • NAGRA IV-S
    Microphones
    Accessories
    Equipment Note

NOTES: This is a noisy fox sparrow recording with a prominant MacGillivray's Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei). The first call notes on the recording are the Evening Grosbeak (Hesperiphona vespertina). MacGillivray's Warbler is the next prominant call, then there is a series of Fox sparrow calls with a song phrase that appears to contain imitations of Turdus migratorius tut-tut call notes. Following this the recording turns into a series of Fox Sparrow with prominant MacGillivray's Warbler. There is also a mountain quail flapping it's wings later in the recording. - SBA 08 Oct. 2002
Location of recording unknown. There are three possible locations; Yuba Pass, Bear Valley, or Jones Valley, all CA locations, US.
Yuba Pass info:
USA, CA, 3km W of Sattley, Latitude: 39 38'N, Longitude: 120 30'W, Altitude: 2010m
Jones Valley Info:
USA, CA, 16 km SE of Loyalton, Latitude: 39 35'N, Longitude: 120 07'W, Altitude: 2100m
Bear Valley Info:
USA, CA, Sierra County

[There appear to be seven songs of Passerella iliaca megarhynchus here (based on range), but they are mixed in with songs of Oporornis tolmiei and the calls of Coccothraustes vespertinus, the Oporornis, Empidonax oberholseri, and Oreortyx pictus. As far as I can determine, there are NO calls of Passerella here, and I am not sure that the sparrow ever sings in the short last part, which instead sounds like the song of Carpodacus cassinii. Quality changed from 2 to 2-3 (at best - the songs of the Oporornis are as loud as those of the Passerella) - CAM - 2 February 2005]

Close Title